classic car forum header
Classic cars forum & vehicle restoration.
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
How To Register     Posting Photographs     Privacy Policy     F/book facebook.com/oldclassiccar

Heat inductor
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Classic cars forum & vehicle restoration. Forum Index -> Vintage Motoring-Related Toys, Tools & Accessories
Author Message
billykan



Joined: 07 Jul 2008
Posts: 15
Location: Isle of Lewis

PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2016 10:31 am    Post subject: Heat inductor Reply with quote

Thinking of buying a heat inductor. look's a good bit of kit, Anybody on here got any experience with them, Thinking of one these in link's below, I like sykes pickavant tool's but i'm thinking the first link below are making the for sykes pickavant

http://theinductor.co.uk/Mini-Ductor

http://sykes-pickavant.com/products/workshop-equipment/heating/1802

Cheer's Ian.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ukdave2002



Joined: 23 Nov 2007
Posts: 3340
Location: South Cheshire

PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2016 10:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What sort of jobs do you envisage using it for?, it seems an expensive if just used to heat up corroded nuts and bolts?

Cheers

Dave
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Bitumen Boy



Joined: 26 Jan 2012
Posts: 1251
Location: Above the snow line in old Monmouthshire

PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2016 12:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm with Dave on this one, it seems a hell of a lot of money for kit that's very specialised and, to my mind, a bit over-sold. If you want to heat up corroded fasteners then nothing electrical is going to beat oxyacetylene, but I suspect that the claimed 1000w rating of this tool isn't even going to beat a simple MAPP torch, available at any decent plumber's merchant for a fraction of the price and a much more useful tool to boot. The risks involved with using a naked flame for heating things are real for sure, but nothing that can't be managed with a little common sense. Also, I doubt that anything likely to be damaged by exposure to heat from any kind of gas torch is much less likely to be damaged by exposure to heat from one of these devices. I wouldn't touch it with a bargepole and suggest anyone that does is likely to be disappointed.

There's a similar device on the market for soldering capillary joints on copper pipes without using a naked flame - essentially two big soldering irons hinged together with specially shaped tips. The makers claim it's ideal for making joints in situations where risk of fire means you can't use a gas torch, but the obvious solution to that problem is to use a simple compression fitting instead. Beware of new types of tools for old jobs, because there's a good chance they're trying to sell you an expensive solution to a problem that doesn't really exist.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
peter scott



Joined: 18 Dec 2007
Posts: 5878
Location: Edinburgh

PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2016 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If the corroded item is at all chunky then I think it has to be the oxy-acetylene. In my experience you need to heat it to red heat and calor gas doesn't achieve this with chunky items.

Peter
_________________
http://www.nostalgiatech.co.uk
1939 SS Jaguar 2 litre saloon
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Classic cars forum & vehicle restoration. Forum Index -> Vintage Motoring-Related Toys, Tools & Accessories All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Forum T&C


php BB powered © php BB Grp.