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1930 Austin 7 Swallow saloon (split)
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norustplease



Joined: 11 Apr 2011
Posts: 494
Location: Lancashire

PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 12:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ray White wrote:
..... I have no indicators on the car but I am considering fitting them. I put some on the dodge this year and glad I did but with the Swallow it's less obvious where to locate them. I could convert the front sidelights to flashers as the headlamps already have additional bulb holders to take some side lights. One thought I had was to combine the brake lights to work as flashers (I have the wiring diagram for this) like on '50's Jags and Fords but although the law allows for original equipment, apparently it would be illegal to retro fit. C&U Regs. I think. Also, people are looking for orange flashers so they might be ineffective.

When they were new these cars only had one very small tail light and no brake lights. The twin rear 'D' lamps are side and brake lights that I have fitted.

Ray.


You can get a conversion kit that puts an extra (orange) bulb into your front sidelight pod. Its quite simple and you could probably concoct your own using modern compact bulbs and holders. My 10/4 has these and they are effective.
The rears are a problem. You can get a relay setup that uses your brake light as an indicator as well, although I am not sure that this might confuse following traffic. I use a couple of motorcycle indicator pods on the rear, mounted on brackets that attach to the bumper bolts, so that they can be removed if required for originality without creating any holes, etc.

Wonderful car, but as I am 6' 5", probably a no go area for me.
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1953 Citroen Traction
1964 Volvo PV544
1986 Renault 4
1990 Citroen 2CV
Boring Fiat 500X
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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 2402
Location: Derby

PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One of the most satisfying (if back breaking) jobs was replacing the fabric roof lining. Unfortunately while the car was left standing outside for several years by the previous owner, water had penetrated and destroyed it. I was able to retrieve enough to use as a pattern so the replacement is an exact copy. I discovered that the impecunious William Lyons had eschewed West of England cloth for a much cheaper alternative; brushed cotton! Over time the fluffy surface has disappeared but while restoring the door cappings I discovered the original finish. I purchased a brushed cotton bed sheet and dyed it in tea to give it the appearance of some age.

(From memory,) the lining is suspended by strips of material tacked to the timber sections of the roof which is itself part of the body frame. To achieve the shape in the rear corners, the material is carefully stretched and tacked to the frame. Getting the fit around the windows was made easier by using hardboard instead of thin plywood.
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peter scott



Joined: 18 Dec 2007
Posts: 5759
Location: Edinburgh

PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 7:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ray,

Thanks for updating the thread. It's great to see your car again.

Peter
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1939 SS Jaguar 2 litre saloon
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Tinworm



Joined: 03 Aug 2010
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 5:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, that is absolutely lovely!
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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 2402
Location: Derby

PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 6:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tinworm wrote:
Wow, that is absolutely lovely!


Thanks, she is my "baby". Actually, I think you know if a car is loved when the owner gives it a name. This is Trundles. First registered in September 1930, 'Trundles' is an early type of Austin Swallow saloon with a traditional coach built (aluminium over Ash frame) body on a basic Austin Seven chassis and running gear. She was sold new by Gaunt's Garage in Outram Street, Sutton in Ashfield, Notts and the original dealer's brass plaque is still on the dash board. The funny thing is that after moving South, after many years, she eventually ended up with me and just by chance we moved to Little Eaton, Derby, which is just down the road from Sutton in Ashfield. !

Of course 'Trundles' has not always looked quite as smart as she does now. When I bought her, she has been neglected and I had to carry out a lot of work to repair the Ash frame; especially the floor area. The area under the rear window had rotted badly and I needed to let in new timber. Same with the running boards which I made from scratch; the ribbed aluminium is quite hard to come by but is correct for the car.

I could write a book on the restoration of Swallow coachwork but it has already been done by Practical Classics with a Standard Swallow.
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