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Brake line corrosion
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badhuis



Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 767
Location: Netherlands

PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 1:15 pm    Post subject: Brake line corrosion Reply with quote

Some brake lines on my Jaguar 420 show rust. So I took out the worst and made a new one. What surprised me though is how thick the walls are of a brake line tube. The "bad" pipe has corrosion on the outside yes, but no way it is even near of a failure.
That said it is never bad to replace any corroded brake lines of course.

(never mind the fluffy threads in the pics - I had cleaned it with a cloth just before making the pics)




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Phil - Nottingham



Joined: 01 Jan 2008
Posts: 1178
Location: Nottingham

PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2018 8:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Corrosion pits in the tube can easily fail under the huge pressure of heavy breaking.

Its only because it cheap that this antiquated steel Bundy is still used in new cars but you only 1 tiny pin hole as the dangerous weak link in the chain
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Bitumen Boy



Joined: 26 Jan 2012
Posts: 1096
Location: Above the snow line in old Monmouthshire

PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2018 11:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Phil - Nottingham wrote:
Corrosion pits in the tube can easily fail under the huge pressure of heavy breaking.

Its only because it cheap that this antiquated steel Bundy is still used in new cars but you only 1 tiny pin hole as the dangerous weak link in the chain


Absolutely. IMO it should have been banned years ago for new cars, it's utterly barking that ABS has to fitted by law but it's absolutely fine to use corrosion prone steel brake pipes.
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troutrunner



Joined: 03 Dec 2012
Posts: 168
Location: South Lincolnshire

PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2018 3:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think that ABS systems run at very high pressure, if this is so, this would make rusty pipes even more vulnerable to bursting.
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Paul
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1937 Ford Model Y.
1939 Austin 10.
1955 Austin A30.
1958 Ford 300E van.
1961 Austin A40.
1964 Wolseley Hornet.
1965 Series2a Land Rover.
1968 Wolseley Hornet.
1994 Peugeot 405 Est. 2of.
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Kenham



Joined: 12 Mar 2012
Posts: 123
Location: Kent

PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2018 8:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A broken brake pipe or ABS is the same thing really as both mean you can't stop!
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troutrunner



Joined: 03 Dec 2012
Posts: 168
Location: South Lincolnshire

PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2018 10:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kenham wrote:
A broken brake pipe or ABS is the same thing really as both mean you can't stop!


But the higher pressure of the ABS system would fail earlier than normal brake, I think.
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Paul
.
1937 Ford Model Y.
1939 Austin 10.
1955 Austin A30.
1958 Ford 300E van.
1961 Austin A40.
1964 Wolseley Hornet.
1965 Series2a Land Rover.
1968 Wolseley Hornet.
1994 Peugeot 405 Est. 2of.
Nil illegitimi Carborundum
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Kenham



Joined: 12 Mar 2012
Posts: 123
Location: Kent

PostPosted: Sun Jan 07, 2018 10:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes quite agree it would, a lot more pressure with ABS , servo's , and traction control all putting more strain on the braking systems. ABS is a pet hate of mine , the work of the devil, why make a perfectly good braking system them introduce a system to stop it working, madness. If anyone on here is new to towing heavy trailers beware as when the ABS comes on the overrun trailer brakes stop working . Sorry if I am getting off subject.
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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 1975
Location: Derby

PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 2:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What do we think of CUNIFER tubing for brake pipes? Personally, I like it. Copper (Cu) Nickel (NI) iron (Fe) has been around since the 1970s and comes in various sizes: 4.8mm, 6.35mm and 8mm diameters. It is typically sold in 25 ft lengths. Exposed lengths can be sheathed in armour covering if you are worried about the risk of it getting snagged. Very easy to handle.
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troutrunner



Joined: 03 Dec 2012
Posts: 168
Location: South Lincolnshire

PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 9:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Ray,

I have used it in the past but lately have gone over to copper, I think that copper is a little softer and slightly more pliable to use but having said that cupronickel is easy to use also. I don't think it matters a jot which one you use IMHO.
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Paul
.
1937 Ford Model Y.
1939 Austin 10.
1955 Austin A30.
1958 Ford 300E van.
1961 Austin A40.
1964 Wolseley Hornet.
1965 Series2a Land Rover.
1968 Wolseley Hornet.
1994 Peugeot 405 Est. 2of.
Nil illegitimi Carborundum
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D4B



Joined: 28 Dec 2010
Posts: 2035
Location: Hampshire UK

PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 1:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have always used Kunifer, it can be tough to flare properly tho, but it is certainly more sturdy.
I seem to remember that the MOT test required copper to have more clips / supports due to it being weaker over a long run than steel or cunifer.


Last edited by D4B on Fri Jan 19, 2018 9:57 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Penguin45



Joined: 28 Jul 2014
Posts: 256
Location: LBA

PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 4:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I use Kunifer. Doesn't rust (steel) or work harden (copper). No problems working it at all.

Bear in mind that copper pipes are now actually illegal in certain countries, Oz being a case in point.

P45.
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