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1927 Morris Cowley Flatnose
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Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 249

PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2018 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The front, sticky-out bits of the chassis where the leaf springs attach were badly worn on one side.
They shouldn't be as the pivot pins are keyed to the chassis and shouldn't revolve or move in this application.
I repaired the bores by applying some weld with my tig welder using ordinary carbon steel rods which seemed to work well on the malleable iron castings.
Then using the Dremmel grinder I ground it roughly round and to under size before finish reaming to 1/2" diameter. Finished by filing the keyway back in with a small square file.

An oval hole



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Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 249

PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2018 4:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

With the car in bits I have decided to have a go at fabricating new side valences as the old ones are a bit frayed around the edges.
I purchased some 1.00mm Zintec steel and a friend bent the sharp 90 degree bend but was unable to do the large radiused bend so a bit of improvising was called for.
At work I found a length of 2" dia bar and made a crude binding jig as seen in the pictures below.
I then had to sneak in the 2 x 2 meter lengths of sheet metal. This sort of thing is frowned upon by management and the security people at work but its surprising what you can get away with go in early, put on a Hi-Viz jacket, gloves and safety glasses and walk around as if you are doing a company job.
The little hole you can see in the last picture (there is another at the other end) was used to enable me to screw the thin sheet to the round bar to aid positioning and to prevent it slipping when I yanked the top over.
They will be welded up later.





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Rick
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Joined: 27 Apr 2005
Posts: 20185
Location: Cheshire

PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2018 5:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice work, Zintec needs a special treatment if I recall correctly (sure you already know this) before putting paint on it.

RJ
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Rick (OCC Admin)
Various 1920s-1960s - Austin, Morris, Commer, Dodge etc.
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Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 249

PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2018 8:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rick wrote:
Nice work, Zintec needs a special treatment if I recall correctly (sure you already know this) before putting paint on it.

RJ

No, I didnt know.
Please tell.
Thanks
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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 2773
Location: Derby

PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2018 11:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not trying to be a know all or anything but I believe the "sticky out bits" are called "dumb irons".

I don't know why.
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Penman



Joined: 23 Nov 2007
Posts: 3946
Location: Lancashire

PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2018 11:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ray
Even doing a web search all I found was what they are with no reference to the origins or etymology of the term
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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 2773
Location: Derby

PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 12:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Penman wrote:
Ray
Even doing a web search all I found was what they are with no reference to the origins or etymology of the term


I understand it goes right back to the days of horse drawn carriages when for appearances sake, a semi elliptical spring could be made to look like a full elliptical one by disguising what would have been the upper spring as a 'dummy' or 'dumb iron' . This arrangement was technically known as an 'under spring'.

On my Austin Swallow, there is another deceptive feature whereby the car (being an Austin Seven) has a single transverse front spring but to give a better impression the front valance is shaped to give the appearance of dumb irons. Unless you knew otherwise, you could be forgiven for thinking that there were two springs under it.

Surprised
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Rick
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Joined: 27 Apr 2005
Posts: 20185
Location: Cheshire

PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 7:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Miken wrote:
Rick wrote:
Nice work, Zintec needs a special treatment if I recall correctly (sure you already know this) before putting paint on it.

RJ

No, I didnt know.
Please tell.
Thanks


Hi,

When my old lorry was restored, the rear end was re-panelled using Zintec. The paint and treatments were provided by HMG in Manchester. The Zintec had to be treated with something called Mordant (Mordent?) wash before paint was applied, otherwise the paint won't adhere properly and, over time, will part company with the metal surface.



RJ
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Rick (OCC Admin)
Various 1920s-1960s - Austin, Morris, Commer, Dodge etc.
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Bitumen Boy



Joined: 26 Jan 2012
Posts: 1320
Location: Above the snow line in old Monmouthshire

PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 6:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I believe a solution of the familiar phosphoric acid is used as a mordant, but don't know what strength is used.
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Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 249

PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2018 4:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for the helpful replies.
I have ordered some mordant solution and also some epoxy primer, mail-order. so hopefully that should stick.
Now, shortly before I took my car off the road to work on it I fitted a new silencer, apparently made to original specifications. It turned out to be just an empty expansion box. It produced a loud, flabby, farty exhaust tone which I dont like at all.
I have been fabricating and welding up a new one from stainless steel that incorporates a glasspack wool filling that I hope will sound nicer.

To avoid messing around with exhaust clamps I have incorporated a welded-on feature at each end that just requires a pinch bolt.

Perforated inner tube and glass wool packing from ebay





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Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 249

PostPosted: Sun Sep 30, 2018 4:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I realised today that I didn't order enough suspension pins from the club. Originally these were hardened and ground. The ones from the club are just turned on a lathe. So the simplest solution was to turn up the missing items myself on the lathe in my shed.
Made from EN32 steel.



The front leaf springs on my car are worn oval on the eyes at each end.
I have a little modelers milling machine and was able to bore the eyes oversize to clean up . I made up some broze bearings and re-bushed them back to 1/2" dia.
On the spring shown and in the background you can see what I think are probably the (slightly fossilised) original leather spring gaiters


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Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 249

PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2019 8:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Havent posted anything on here for a while.
I sent all the black chassis parts off and had them all shot blased, hot zinc metal sprayed and epoxy coated. So should last a while.
Then spent a couple of weekends putting the car back together again.



I had the rear springs refurbished




I made new bushes and shackle pins for all the suspension.

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Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 249

PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2019 9:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rebuilt steering assembly



I laid greasey Denso tape between the chassis and body to protect and prevent squeaks



Here is how I lifted and replaced the body using a fence post and hoist



Reassembly was quite straightforward and quick.
I fitted all new steering joints and kingpins/bushes.
refurbished dynastarter so for the first time the car charges its battery.
new valve seats fitted to engine after damage done by leaking head joint.



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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 2773
Location: Derby

PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2019 10:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent work, Mike.

How was your steering? Would now be a good time to consider fitting some castor correction wedges?
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Rick
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Apr 2005
Posts: 20185
Location: Cheshire

PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2019 11:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very interesting to follow progress, thanks for the latest instalment.

RJ
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Rick (OCC Admin)
Various 1920s-1960s - Austin, Morris, Commer, Dodge etc.
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