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Daily Driver Challenge
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Bitumen Boy



Joined: 26 Jan 2012
Posts: 1300
Location: Above the snow line in old Monmouthshire

PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 1:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vulgalour wrote:
Oh, I know where the water is getting in, it's coming through the worn out windscreen seal and the worn out driver's door window seal. I've got a new seal for the former, I'm just waiting for warmer weather before fitting it to reduce the risk of breaking the windscreen since I'll have to reuse the one that's fitted to the car. The interior stays dry, and the fogging up only really happens on a very wet day for the first half a mile or so of driving in that day, after that it doesn't fog up again even with all the windows up.


Regarding the damp, have you tried using a simple dessicant type dehumidifier? I've been rotating two for the modern for the last few winters that really seem to help keep the inside of the car dry and reduce the problem. They're only small fabric pillows - about the size of my hand - filled with absorbent silica gel, they just sit on top of the dash and go on top of the radiator in the house when they need "recharging" - though you can microwave them too, I believe.

You can also make a cheaper version yourself. The silica gel filling is also sold as cat litter (!) in some shops, then all you need is to make up a suitable fabric bag, something with a fairly close weave to keep the granules inside. I've done some for drying boots using some socks from Poundland that work just fine.
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BigJohn



Joined: 01 Jan 2011
Posts: 863
Location: Nr. Lancaster

PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 3:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Re the leaking screen, when I had new seal fitted to my screens the front kept leaking the bottom corners, so, as it was cheap and for marine applications, I bought some Capt. Tolley's Creeping Crack Cure. After I applied it my next drive out in the rain caused the inside corners of the seal to lactate a milky liquid. Since then after four years, dry.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Captain-Tolleys-Creeping-Crack-Cure-Sealant-60ml-CARAVAN-MOTORHOME-BOAT/322512805440?epid=1048738179&hash=item4b1742de40:g:nBgAAOSwRoZZh4Xk
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1974 Mk1 Escort. 1992 Mk1 Golf Clipper Cabriolet Auto.
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Rick
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Apr 2005
Posts: 20093
Location: Cheshire

PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 5:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BigJohn wrote:
Re the leaking screen, when I had new seal fitted to my screens the front kept leaking the bottom corners, so, as it was cheap and for marine applications, I bought some Capt. Tolley's Creeping Crack Cure. After I applied it my next drive out in the rain caused the inside corners of the seal to lactate a milky liquid. Since then after four years, dry.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Captain-Tolleys-Creeping-Crack-Cure-Sealant-60ml-CARAVAN-MOTORHOME-BOAT/322512805440?epid=1048738179&hash=item4b1742de40:g:nBgAAOSwRoZZh4Xk


Funny you should mention this as I've been trying to remember the name of this stuff, someone recommended it to me a while ago.

RJ
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Various 1920s-1960s - Austin, Morris, Commer, Dodge etc.
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alastairq



Joined: 14 Oct 2016
Posts: 1058
Location: East Yorkshire

PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 5:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Possibly me? I use it regularly on the Mustang....these leak more than wiki!

The important thing is to regularly apply the stuff..it's not a once-only solution.
It takes maybe 5 minutes once a month?
_________________
Dellow Mk2, 1951 built, reg 1952.
Ford Mustang coupe, 1967, 6 cylinder auto.
Fiat 126 BIS
Cannon special [1996 registered. Built in 1950's]
----------------------------------------------
Ford Pop chassis, Ashley 1172 bodyshell, in pieces.
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emmerson



Joined: 30 Sep 2008
Posts: 1166
Location: South East Wales

PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2019 6:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I must agree with all the comments about full-time use of old vehicles.
For a couple of months I used my 1987 Talbot camper van as daily runabout, and currently alternate it with a modern Kangoo diesel (which I dislike) and the only major problem with Talbot v Kangoo is the manual choke, as I always remember to use it to cold-start, but forget every time after that. This results in some horrible kangaroo-ing down the road for the first 100 yards!
Other than that the old thing is fine, although I have had electric power steering fitted now.
And of course, I regularly service it myself, which I cannot do with the Kangoo.
There is one other big advantage to the camper; when Herself goes shopping, I can sit back and brew up!
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Vulgalour



Joined: 08 May 2018
Posts: 131
Location: Middlesbrough and Kent

PostPosted: Wed Mar 06, 2019 7:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've heard lots of good things about Tolley's. I don't think it will help in my instance because the leak is due to the top edge of the windscreen rubber having gone porous, it seems. It has little pockholes in places, a bit like a paint-filled sponge to look at. The dampness inside is little more than condensation on the inside of the windscreen and while the dehumidifier pads do work - I've used a variety of options - I find it's easier to just use the car regularly to keep it aired out. The Princess was supposed to be spending this winter in the garage to keep it nice and dry, unfortunately it's been a year of being messed about with house purchasing so instead the garage is full of packed boxes and furniture which is far from ideal.

In better news, the wheel bearing kit has arrived so I'm hoping my next end of week report will feature that job being done. The BX has also had some attention and now the LHM system on that is leak free and the brakes and suspension work properly again, so that's a step closer to being on the road.
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ukdave2002



Joined: 23 Nov 2007
Posts: 3359
Location: South Cheshire

PostPosted: Wed Mar 06, 2019 8:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

emmerson wrote:
I must agree with all the comments about full-time use of old vehicles.
For a couple of months I used my 1987 Talbot camper van as daily runabout
And of course, I regularly service it myself, which I cannot do with the Kangoo.


If you can service a 1987 Talbot, servicing the Kangoo would be a piece of cake Smile

Dave
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ukdave2002



Joined: 23 Nov 2007
Posts: 3359
Location: South Cheshire

PostPosted: Wed Mar 06, 2019 8:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

emmerson wrote:
I must agree with all the comments about full-time use of old vehicles.
For a couple of months I used my 1987 Talbot camper van as daily runabout
And of course, I regularly service it myself, which I cannot do with the Kangoo.
There is one other big advantage to the camper; when Herself goes shopping, I can sit back and brew up!


If you can service a 1987 Talbot, servicing the Kangoo would be a piece of cake Smile

Dave
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Bitumen Boy



Joined: 26 Jan 2012
Posts: 1300
Location: Above the snow line in old Monmouthshire

PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2019 2:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vulgalour wrote:

The dampness inside is little more than condensation on the inside of the windscreen and while the dehumidifier pads do work - I've used a variety of options - I find it's easier to just use the car regularly to keep it aired out.


IMO the dehumidifier pads are complementary to regular use, not a substitute for it.
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Norseman



Joined: 09 Jan 2019
Posts: 70
Location: Essex UK

PostPosted: Sun Mar 10, 2019 2:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To return to the original title (D.D challenge) I've got a decision to make. I already have a classic Range Rover & we run a '06 euro-box as a daily, but that pays a high 315 VED based on emissions. Now with us both retired I want to reduce cost but the RR is far too heavy on fuel for a daily & although we both love old cars good classics are now so expensive to buy, esp. VED exempt examples. It looks like a small (ie low emission) modern is going to be the route to take Crying or Very sad
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1987 classic Range Rover Vouge.

A great many models have served me well since the 'sixties, all of them old & some even older than me.
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Vulgalour



Joined: 08 May 2018
Posts: 131
Location: Middlesbrough and Kent

PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2019 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

90s cars are where the bargains are at for daily drivers since they seem to be the best of both worlds. They tend to have good fuel economy, tax rates are generally reasonable, parts support is still good for many of them and there's plenty of really excellent examples for very little money. I'd highly recommend picking something up from the mid-90s if you want something reliable and affordable, they won't be overlooked forever.

VED exemption offers a negligable saving realistically, I shan't be Moneybags McGee when the Princess becomes exempt and it's hardly the most fuel economical thing in the world compared to something more modern... that said it does still return better economy than my housemate's diesel P38.

The best way to circumnavigate the investment in a classic car at purchase point is to buy something nobody wants but that you are interested in. Doesn't work if the only things that excite you are mainstream options, unfortunately.

Alternatively, consider the compromise of 90s cars. They can't stay cheap forever, and some certainly aren't any more. VED is generally not that high on them. They usually come with modern conveniences such as electric windows and power steering, while not being full of beeps and bongs and whatnot. Some even have safety equipment like airbags. On fuel, most are very good, and many still have excellent parts support. They're also much easier to get an excellent example at a reasonable price. It would certainly cost a lot less to insure, tax, and run than something modern usually would and give you a spot in between modern and classic to enjoy... or be disappointed that it's not quite one thing or the other.

---

End of Week 16 - Unidentified noise finally identified when wheel bearing play was found. At the same time, it was discovered one of the CV boots (on the opposite side to the problem wheel bearing) had split. Parts ordered.

End of Week 17 - couldn't undo the hub nuts because they're on far too tight for any of the tools and people I have access to. For the first time ever I've had to book the car in at a garage to have work done and, since the MoT is due at the start of April anyway, decided to get it all done in one go. Car was dropped off on Thursday and I've been without personal transport since.

I don't know whether or not to regard this as the end of the 6 month experiment. We've done four months and this is the only thing I haven't been able to sort out myself. It's also the sort of repair job even much newer cars require, so it's not like it's a strange Princess-specific failure, or even an old-car-specific failure.

I'll keep logging the weekly reports (when I remember) until the six months are up and then do a review, assess things on balance at the end of it.
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alastairq



Joined: 14 Oct 2016
Posts: 1058
Location: East Yorkshire

PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2019 7:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Recently a chum & I splashed out 8 quid for a Dee Atkinson auction catalogue[which gave entry for two]....
A lot of bikes [with motors]...a few cars
https://www.dee-atkinson-harrison.co.uk/page/101-next-sale-preview

As an example of some of what was on show.

We went to the preview.....
However, one item was a Peugeot 205 automatic , of a special edition whose title I cannot remember. It was presented very cleanly...almost immaculate, in fact, with relatively low mileage..obviously garaged ts whole life....maybe not used if owned by an older person? certianly the interior was also immaculate [from what I could see]....
Sadly I wasn't in the market for buying anything [we went for the display, and it was very local to me/us]...but I can imagine an automatic Pug 205 might not appeal to most drivers?
However, I'm not really 'most'' drivers, and I could certainly see the appeal for me to use as a low mileage daily driver.....[I don't do very man miles a year now I'm retired]...getting older, an auto does appeal..even a small one......plus, the car was so last century [as my daughter might put it]....with low waistline, lots of glass.....a change from todays slab sided panzervagens?

Plus, being a Pug..cheap enough to run?
_________________
Dellow Mk2, 1951 built, reg 1952.
Ford Mustang coupe, 1967, 6 cylinder auto.
Fiat 126 BIS
Cannon special [1996 registered. Built in 1950's]
----------------------------------------------
Ford Pop chassis, Ashley 1172 bodyshell, in pieces.
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emmerson



Joined: 30 Sep 2008
Posts: 1166
Location: South East Wales

PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2019 9:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Norseman wrote:
To return to the original title (D.D challenge) I've got a decision to make. I already have a classic Range Rover & we run a '06 euro-box as a daily, but that pays a high 315 VED based on emissions. Now with us both retired I want to reduce cost but the RR is far too heavy on fuel for a daily & although we both love old cars good classics are now so expensive to buy, esp. VED exempt examples. It looks like a small (ie low emission) modern is going to be the route to take Crying or Very sad


Norseman, as mentioned above I use a 2007 Kangoo diesel as my daily. Its a one owner car (my neighbour's daughter), so I've known the car all its life. It's done mega miles (175,000) but was serviced by the main dealer every year, with no expense spared. She got in a panic last October when it started a rattle in the engine. Her father told her it was knackered, so she bought a new car!
I came home from France to be told they were scrapping the car. My offer of 300 was accepted. I diagnosed the rattle as a worn camshaft, flushed the oil and changed it twice in 1,000 miles, and the little thing still rattles along, now on 178,000. It has never missed a beat, returns over 50 mpg, and road tax is 140 pa.
I've now got my Discovery back, so really the Renault is surplus, but it is so cheap that I think I'll keep it until the camshaft finally breaks, or something else major goes wrong, as it has already paid for itself.
I can highly recommend the Kangoo diesel as a cheap runabout, though I do dislike the bl**dy thing!
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Norseman



Joined: 09 Jan 2019
Posts: 70
Location: Essex UK

PostPosted: Tue Mar 26, 2019 12:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Many thanks for all your replies, I agree that cars from the 'eighties & 'nineties are the best value for a daily with a saving of 100 in VED if the engine capacity is less than 1550cc but of course their performance in modern traffic through a slush-box will be depleted. I currently pay 255 for my classic Range Rover but the fuel consumption precludes it from duties as a daily !
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1987 classic Range Rover Vouge.

A great many models have served me well since the 'sixties, all of them old & some even older than me.
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Vulgalour



Joined: 08 May 2018
Posts: 131
Location: Middlesbrough and Kent

PostPosted: Tue Mar 26, 2019 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can keep up with modern traffic without being a danger in the Princess, a car that doesn't so much accelerate as gather pace, so you'll be fine in a good automatic from the era discussed. Even an automatic Princess can keep pace, especially if married up to the 2.2 engine, though then we'll be back to the issue of fuel consumption.

Presumably you want something as fast as the Range Rover, and as well appointed, with an automatic gearbox but better on fuel. For that I'd be looking at the offerings of Honda, Toyota, and Rover. Things like the Honda Legend or Prelude, Toyota Corolla Liftback or Sera (if you want something a bit more weird), Rover 600 or even an SD1 would all fit the bill one way or another.

It's down to personal taste too, naturally. For 2000 you can pick up a project car from the 60s-80s, something that will usually need a fair amount of work to make it really nice. Spend the same money on something from the late 80s and 90s and you can get an exceptional ordinary car or even a viable sports or luxury car.

I've had 38mpg out of the Princess, 52mpg out of my Rover 400. Actually, a good source of real-world mpg for all sorts of vehicles is www.fuelly.com because it allows you to see what people really get from vehicles and might help in your quest.
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