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not good - Austin 8
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classic jenny



Joined: 04 Jun 2009
Posts: 12

PostPosted: Sat Oct 31, 2009 4:55 pm    Post subject: not good - Austin 8 Reply with quote

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After taking the "8" out I had a knocking. Stopping to check the wheel nuts were tight this is what I found. Thank him upstairs for the slower speeds of these cars Shocked now wanted good home if you have a spare Austin 8 wheel Very Happy
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Rick
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Joined: 27 Apr 2005
Posts: 20345
Location: Cheshire

PostPosted: Sat Oct 31, 2009 5:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Jenny, can you add in the dimensions of the wheel you're looking for. I have one or two unidentified steel rims of that age behind the garage, may or may not be of use but I'll check

RJ
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Various 1920s-1960s - Austin, Morris, Commer, Dodge etc.
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Jim.Walker



Joined: 27 Dec 2008
Posts: 1233
Location: Chesterfield

PostPosted: Sat Oct 31, 2009 9:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This looks like a classic case of over-tightened wheel nuts! Why do people think manufacturers supply wheel braces with so little leverage??? The correct torque for most cars is around 30lbf/ft for pressed steel wheels. Any tighter can fracture the wheel centre. Morris Minor owners especially. BEWARE.
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buzzy bee



Joined: 23 Nov 2007
Posts: 3397
Location: South Cheshire

PostPosted: Sat Oct 31, 2009 10:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi

Tractor tyres are the exception from this rule, to torque them sufficently, you need at least a 3/4" drive torque wrench, around 260lb (for the ones the other day.

Cheers

Dave
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classic jenny



Joined: 04 Jun 2009
Posts: 12

PostPosted: Sun Nov 01, 2009 11:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Rick the wheel size is 17in if yours look like the pick then hopefully should fit.
JIm I would agree with you. but unless this was overtightend over the years causing a weekness in the wheel I always fit my own tyres and only use the old trusted spider to tighten the nuts. Having been a tyre fitter many years ago I have seen the results of over tight nuts too often
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Uncle Alec



Joined: 14 Jan 2008
Posts: 732
Location: Manchester

PostPosted: Sun Nov 01, 2009 12:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Riley RMs are slightly prone to the wheel centre fracturing - it happened to me a few years ago resulting in a fine and points.
My nuts aren't too tight, they are made of brass. Embarassed
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Jim.Walker



Joined: 27 Dec 2008
Posts: 1233
Location: Chesterfield

PostPosted: Sun Nov 01, 2009 12:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Uncle Alec wrote:
Riley RMs are slightly prone to the wheel centre fracturing - it happened to me a few years ago resulting in a fine and points.
My nuts aren't too tight, they are made of brass. Embarassed


Even brass nuts can be severely overtightened before they strip!
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are ever likely to want". Computers had not been invented then!
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Rick
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Posts: 20345
Location: Cheshire

PostPosted: Wed Nov 18, 2009 4:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi again, I dug out the wheel I mentioned, also a 17" but sadly a six stud fitting Confused (Morris perhaps) - 4.50x17 tyre fitted

Sorry!

R
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Various 1920s-1960s - Austin, Morris, Commer, Dodge etc.


Last edited by Rick on Thu Nov 19, 2009 1:52 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PAUL BEAUMONT



Joined: 27 Nov 2007
Posts: 1272
Location: Barnsley S. Yorks

PostPosted: Thu Nov 19, 2009 1:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It would be useful to know the tyre size too!
Using Radial ply tyres can also accellerate this type of failure
PAUL
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Jim.Walker



Joined: 27 Dec 2008
Posts: 1233
Location: Chesterfield

PostPosted: Thu Nov 19, 2009 1:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

PAUL BEAUMONT wrote:
It would be useful to know the tyre size too!
Using Radial ply tyres can also accellerate this type of failure
PAUL


Would you care to expand on that Paul? I cannot see any reason for that. After all, all the radial and axial forces on a tyre are dictated by the forces on the vehicle, which are only transmitted to the road by the tyres. As radial tyres have softer walls and more 'give' those forces are surely handled in a 'gentlier' fashion? Admittedly the actual tyre tread grip on the road MAY (but not under all conditions) be marginally higher, but not significantly in actual forces on the wheel taking in the performance parameters of classic cars.
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are ever likely to want". Computers had not been invented then!
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peterwpg



Joined: 10 Apr 2008
Posts: 2223
Location: New Brunswick. Canada

PostPosted: Thu Nov 19, 2009 7:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Paul raises a point about wheels and the use of Radial tires.

I haven't been able to find if this has been studied in any scientific tests or whether the comment comes from urban legend.

Having said that, I guess we all know that Radial Tires do give us a slightly harder ride than crossply, so if the radial doesn't absorb the same shock, would it be reasonable to presume that more stress is put on the wheel.

Anyone who has driven "roadcars" in competion, racing or rallying, will know that wheels nuts can come loose, so extra strain can cause a problem.

I know that when we take the SUV "up north" we do check the wheel nuts en route.
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PAUL BEAUMONT



Joined: 27 Nov 2007
Posts: 1272
Location: Barnsley S. Yorks

PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2009 2:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

May be Urban myth, but I have come across the problem of cracked rims a few times and it always seems to be associated with rims originally made for cross plies, now fitted with Radial tyres. I suspect, but have no evidence to back it up, that radial ply tyres encourage more adventurous use of a vehicle, so the rims see higher loads on cornering etc?
Anyone else got views?
PAUL
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Jim.Walker



Joined: 27 Dec 2008
Posts: 1233
Location: Chesterfield

PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2009 2:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cracked centres were not all that uncommon even in the pre-radial days (that comment might fit me - I am probably cracked and I was driving in pre-radial days!).
I have never met cracked rims except on alloy wheels (the use of which frightens me a bit) or as a result of kerbing etc. when pressed steel wheels usually bend anyway. By the way, the type of wheel shown in the earlier post was introduced as the Easy Clean wheel.
Still open to listening and learning from the experiences of others though.
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are ever likely to want". Computers had not been invented then!
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47Jag



Joined: 26 Jun 2008
Posts: 1460
Location: Bothwell, Scotland

PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2009 2:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My understanding is that the radial tyres maintains a more constant contact patch thereby providing better grip especially in cornering. This must increase the forces on the wheelnut due to the higher loads due to leverage. SIMPLES!! Smile

Art
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Nic Jarman



Joined: 05 Oct 2008
Posts: 1035
Location: Stoke by Clare, Suffolk

PostPosted: Fri Nov 20, 2009 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I must take the Morris 8 for a track day.
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