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What did you do to your car today?
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BigJohn



Joined: 01 Jan 2011
Posts: 905
Location: Nr. Lancaster

PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2020 5:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Took the Golf for an MOT, passed no advisories, Hooray! Then the alarm started playing up on the run home, Boo! Two steps forward, one step backward. Very Happy
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1974 Mk1 Escort. 1992 Mk1 Golf Clipper Cabriolet Auto.
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MikeEdwards



Joined: 25 May 2011
Posts: 1864
Location: South Cheshire

PostPosted: Thu Jan 30, 2020 10:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

badhuis wrote:
Regarding "moving some shelving" - it seems half of all time spend in the garage is by cleaning up the work place, finding new spaces, making new shelves and moving things around.


Yes, I have that issue too. And then the increased time in finding the stuff I've moved around.

I spent a bit of time the other day trying to sort out a problem with the dash lighting in the Firenza. The lighting is powered from a plastic "circuit board", which has tags around a hole. The lamp holders have capless bulbs in them, and push into the hole, making contact with the two tags and lighting the lamp.

There are four in the instrument panel, and two of them don't work. It's not the bulbs, so I can only presume that one or both tag has snapped off - they go brittle over the years and I had the same problem with the other car. So I spent some time making a flying lead with four LEDs on it, spaced out to get to each hole, then an in-line resistor to drop the 12v down to something suitable. Lots of heat-shrink used, ages messing around, tested it, all works, so I come to fit it in the car. Unfortunately it's nowhere near bright enough - I can see the light is on, but it doesn't do anything to light the tachometer.

Yesterday I made another flying lead, this time wiring directly to two bulb holders, and without the resistor. This addresses the problem of holding the lamps in place, and hopefully restores the lighting on that side of the dash. As I pondered it last night, though, I have another problem in that I either have to be very careful to put the holders in the correct way around, or need to insulate the contacts, which could be difficult as they're quite tight.

I did all of this to save me the time of removing the instrument panel, which means removing the whole dash first. I'm almost at a point where I've not saved any time, and will end up with a poor solution to the problem.
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Bitumen Boy



Joined: 26 Jan 2012
Posts: 1409
Location: Above the snow line in old Monmouthshire

PostPosted: Thu Jan 30, 2020 1:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MikeEdwards wrote:
I'm almost at a point where I've not saved any time, and will end up with a poor solution to the problem.


Rolling Eyes I think we've all been there at some point... Laughing
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alanb



Joined: 10 Sep 2012
Posts: 428
Location: Berkshire.

PostPosted: Thu Jan 30, 2020 5:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah modern technology, or not so modern, many years ago my son had a similar problem with his Nova sri when it wasn't that old and ended up buying a new printed circuit membrane, fortunately they were readily available. I had the fuel gauge fail on my Citroen Xantia and had to have a complete new instrument cluster again it was fairly new and was replaced under warranty, had it happened now it would write the car off.
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old tourer


Morris 8 two seater
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Vulgalour



Joined: 08 May 2018
Posts: 173
Location: Kent

PostPosted: Thu Jan 30, 2020 11:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Happily, I now have the Princess at the new house. It had been staying at the old house with my friend while I got everything organised at the new house, and what a boon it was to have that little bit of extra time!



Unfortunately, the garage at the new house is just a little bit too narrow and almost too short to be practical as car storage unless we empty absolutely everything else out of it and, since we haven't got a shed yet, that's not really an option. Now everything is in one place, I can set to fixing the head after my little mishap with the valves a little while ago.
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MikeEdwards



Joined: 25 May 2011
Posts: 1864
Location: South Cheshire

PostPosted: Fri Jan 31, 2020 10:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There was a photo of your Princess on FB the other day on the back of a beavertail of some sort.
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Vulgalour



Joined: 08 May 2018
Posts: 173
Location: Kent

PostPosted: Fri Jan 31, 2020 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It was spotted more than once on it's long ride south.



Couldn't fault the chap that did the delivery for me, he made it much more affordable and convenient than had I transported it myself.
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alanb



Joined: 10 Sep 2012
Posts: 428
Location: Berkshire.

PostPosted: Fri Jan 31, 2020 3:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just love your BX I had 2 in succession in the early 90s G reg & K reg both company cars, good tow car too.
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old tourer


Morris 8 two seater
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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 3287
Location: Derby

PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2020 9:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Today I turned my attention to the sump. XPAG engines seem to have a reputation for oil leaks so as I have had the rear crank main bearing machined to accept a speedi sleeve and modern oil seal I thought it would be spoiling the ship etc. to not upgrade the front end.

On examining the extension to the crank pulley on which the seal runs, it seemed to look very slightly corroded. It would probably be O.K. but I decided to replace it and fit a rubber lip seal.

Before fitting the new parts I thought long and hard about what finish I wanted for the sump. Originally, it would have been painted dark red to match the block. I am not keen on that.

An alternative would to be polished aluminium. This was going to be the preferred option but unfortunately there were just too many rough areas of fabrication to make it look good.

I know you don't spend all day looking at the sump - as it is, my wife says I spend too much time "faffing about" - but in the end I decided to paint in a silver grey colour. With a clear lacquer finish it should remain "shiny" .

With the ribbed sump stripped back to bare metal I applied a coat of Hammerite special metals primer in readiness for the silver grey top coat. I will leave the primer to dry overnight.

Faffing about. Huh!
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badhuis



Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 1112
Location: Netherlands

PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2020 10:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Replaced the leaking, bad performing carburettor on the Jensen for a new Edelbrock one. Had to fabricate a mounting for the throttle cable and kick down lever. Engine runs much better now.

Then started on the door lock. It is pretty difficult to turn the key to lock it. So much that I have a fear of breaking the key. Cleaned and greased the lock on the workbench, it locks and unlocks well but still too much effort needed for the key. I then mounted an electric retraction motor from a central door locking kit (I have already installed a similar one in the other door). It entails a pin moving the locking / unlocking lever. Removed some trim panels from the lower dashboard to put the wiring across.

Next on the list is to check the upper door glass frame, maybe it needs a little tuning (it is adjustable in all directions). Then installing the door panel. Which is time consuming on a Jensen as it is surrounded by chrome plates at the edges. My car had new doors 20+ years ago, and the inner door panels were never installed so I have to drill multiple holes to screw the chrome plates in. Better take my time for it.

If all goes to plan the car will have electric central door locking, invisible on the car but so much better for the frugal door key locks.
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a car stops being fun when it becomes an investment
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norustplease



Joined: 11 Apr 2011
Posts: 610
Location: Lancashire

PostPosted: Wed Feb 05, 2020 1:11 pm    Post subject: Hubcaps Reply with quote

More like what my car did to itself!
Whilst out with the Volvo the other day, a car drew up alongside me at the traffic lights. the driver wound down her window and said did I know that I had lost a hubcap. I asked where, and she gave a vague description of a previous junction.
I turned around in a pub carpark and then retraced my route, but could see nothing other than the usual crop of smashed modern plastic wheel covers. However, my rear offside hubcap was definitely missing. It is probably a trophy on some kid's bedroom wall now!!! Either that or as soon as I buy a new one, it will appear propped up against a wall somewhere!!
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1964 Volvo PV544
1986 Renault 4
1990 Citroen 2CV
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Rick
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Apr 2005
Posts: 21018
Location: North-west UK

PostPosted: Wed Feb 05, 2020 7:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nothing particularly exciting, but the lower steering column on 'erindoors' Grand Vitara (silly name) has been exhibiting some play in the bottom UJ (there are two, the lower one cops all the muck and spray thrown up from the road). So a couple of hours over lunchtime/early pm were spent fitting a replacement, good job really as with it off, the lower UJ feels quite notchy so wouldn't have lasted much longer.

RJ
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Various 1920s-1960s - Austin, Morris, Commer, Dodge etc.
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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 3287
Location: Derby

PostPosted: Wed Feb 05, 2020 7:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I made a start on fitting the new "fast road" camshaft and bearings. After bolting the load leveller to the block I winched it onto the bench.
My progress was halted by the discovery that the rear and centre bearing locating screws were missing. I seem to remember refitting them to the block when I sent it off for a rebore etc.

The trouble is that these are M8 x1 with a spigot end. These "mad metrics" are an obsolete thread with which all pre war Morris and MG owners will be familiar.

I tried unsuccessfully to machine the end of an old sump bolt before phoning the Octagon Car Club spares service and ordering a couple of new ones. I also ordered a 'magnetic' sump plug.

The camshaft retaining plate bolts were also missing but these seem to be normal M6 thread and I have a good selection of these fasteners.
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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 3287
Location: Derby

PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2020 8:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Having fitted the camshaft using Graphogen lube and located the rear and middle (split) bearings with the correct screws I turned to the front bearing. This is a thin split bearing that in the past would have needed reaming but this later design obviates that need. It is an interference fit and requires careful fitting. It is possible to use the thread in the end of the shaft to mount a gear press onto the end of the block. If such a devise is not available then it is quite possible to gently drift the bearing into place... but extreme care is required.

The new gears and chain come with no datum marks and where the original chain would have a couple of "bright" links, the new (improved) chain has none. I discovered that there were originally 13 links on one side of the highlighted links and 15 links on the other so I selected two suitable links and painted them with white enamel paint.

I then copied the scribed line on the old camshaft gear onto the new one. Using a new key (to fit the slightly wider slot in the new shaft) I trial fitted the sprocket. No problems.

The crankshaft gear will need to be marked later in relation to a "white" chain link but before everything is fitted I need to paint the engine mounting plate.

Compare the new sprocket with the old one. I fail to understand why anyone would abuse a timing gear in this manner.

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Rootes75



Joined: 30 Apr 2013
Posts: 2822
Location: The Somerset Levels

PostPosted: Sun Feb 09, 2020 2:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Did some more clearing and shifting in the shed this morning. Managed to make enough space to move the Commer back 4 ft, we have some more to shift but almost have enough space to get our 55 Hillman in and under cover.
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1947 Hillman Minx
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