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Driving through California in 1935
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Rick
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Joined: 27 Apr 2005
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Location: UK

PostPosted: Tue Mar 16, 2021 5:23 pm    Post subject: Driving through California in 1935 Reply with quote

The colourising is a little distracting but great footage nevertheless

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ViNoQd4OaIo

RJ
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Rick (OCC Admin)
Various 1920s-1960s - Austin, Morris, Commer, Dodge etc.
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peter scott



Joined: 18 Dec 2007
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 16, 2021 7:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very interesting. You'd certainly never run out of "gas".

Peter
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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 16, 2021 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A very interesting period in American car use as it shows how Ford's grip has weakened as the public look to alternative manufacturers.
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PapaJoe



Joined: 09 Nov 2020
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Location: Massachusetts USA

PostPosted: Tue Mar 16, 2021 11:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ray, You're so right. Henry Ford stuck with the Model T too long giving GM the opportunity to make Chevrolet number one in sales during the Model A's production period. The Chevy six took sales away from Ford forcing cylinder wars in 1932 with the introduction of Ford's flathead V8. Initial reliability problems with those flatheads allowed Chevy to stick with the Stovebolt Six for many years to come. The Depression era didn't help any manufacturer.
Regards,
Joe
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mikeC



Joined: 31 Jul 2009
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 17, 2021 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting to see the Americans had already adopted the arm-out-of-the-window driving style - I thought that was something that came in the late 1940s with the development of power steering.
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alastairq



Joined: 14 Oct 2016
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Location: East Yorkshire

PostPosted: Wed Mar 17, 2021 6:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mikeC wrote:
Interesting to see the Americans had already adopted the arm-out-of-the-window driving style - I thought that was something that came in the late 1940s with the development of power steering.


Most of the cheaper end of the American car market [Ford etc] didn't have power steering [as standard] right into the 1970's.
But they did likely have very low geared steering.....[in fact, on my '67 Mustang, power steering was only an option, & the standard non-powered steering box was lower geared than the power steered version...which was/is a trick to reduce the number of turns, lock to lock, on a non power steered car., doing a box swap. To convert [my?] power steered car to non power steering I would mainly need a non power steered idler arm, as the PS version is weaker, and will likely crack if the car is driven many miles without the power assistance. For example, if a hose splits, or the pump belt snaps. However, the power assistance is incredibly light, with little feel, and is not weighted to match the speed. I'm used to it, but to begin with it was a bit of 'shock'.]
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Churchill Johnson



Joined: 11 Jan 2011
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 17, 2021 11:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ref the arm out of window still see plenty of planks that do it, strange when one breaks the law by phone, eating, drinking which can lead to a fine but never seen any get stopped because of arm usage, love the film and love to see that some things never change like moving lanes without indication same today.
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peter scott



Joined: 18 Dec 2007
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2021 10:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is a certain illogicality about the eating and drinking relative to the phone use. It doesn't take your attention away from your driving to stuff a sandwich in your mouth but typing phone numbers or texting certainly does.

Peter
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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2021 11:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

peter scott wrote:
There is a certain illogicality about the eating and drinking relative to the phone use. It doesn't take your attention away from your driving to stuff a sandwich in your mouth but typing phone numbers or texting certainly does.

Peter


I agree but I tend to think that I should not have passed my driving test if I had been eating or drinking at the time. I am not good company when driving and don't like talking or even listening to music or the radio.

I can remember ignoring Ted Clements (the chief I.A.M. examiner) during my advanced driving test. He was chatting away about something irrelevant and asked my opinion. I had to apologise for not listening to him as I was concentrating on my driving. I expected him to be miffed but on the contrary; he was delighted!

On the other side of the coin, I am probably the worst type of passenger and find myself often pressing my right foot against an imaginary brake pedal. ! Laughing
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alastairq



Joined: 14 Oct 2016
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Location: East Yorkshire

PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2021 1:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The crux of the matter is 'maintaining control'....so someone 'seen' quaffing a coffee, or munching a ham roll, could find themselves getting 'pulled n ticketed'..as has been reported now & again over the years?

However, there is [in my own opinion] an argument here regarding the 'handling' of a steering wheel?

In practice, to properly handle the steering wheel, one uses but one hand at a time.
Gripping the wheel with both hands at the same time can, & does, lead to see-sawing of the wheel...and consequent wavering path down the road. Over-correction, etc.

One uses one hand on the wheel, to change gear? Or to indicate? Or to proffer a hand signal? Or to operate a switch or lever or handbrake? Or to operate a window[especially the windy-windy type}..Or to re-set one's mirrors?

In other words, I suppose, going in front of a Magistrate and cast 'reasonable doubt' on the reported failure to maintain control accusation, is workable. Few bother to try it though. Instead preferring to vilify the constabulary for not having 'better things to do?'
Much will depend on what the vehicle was doing prior to the driver being 'spotted?'

When I drive my Mustang [being a 'bigger' person, although not clinically, or otherwise, obese. Yet!], the 'normal' seating position when driving actually places my left arm/elbow very close indeed, to the driver's door. In fact, it is easier and more comfortable to open the window and stick the elbow out.
There is no way I can sit closer to the centre of the car!
Which is good for social distancing, I admit.

On the basis that Ford designers of the era knew what they were about, perhaps most US-designed cars had this seating position deliberately?

Perhaps there was another agenda, which might be seen as alien to a UK driver's mind?
That agenda being, given the predominant climate of a lot of the USA [warm to hot, very sunny, quite alien to the UK?].....then the driver being positioned close to the door, and the open windows, keeps them cooler, more comfortable, and alert?
So, far from being a slap-happy lackadaisical driving technique, it may be quite the opposite?
Also useful for drying out one's armpits in hot weather?

I have to admit to admiring how well Ford's designers did their job with the Mustang [my only real practical experience]....without the benefit of standard aircon [available as an option]...the side windows both wind down [on my coupe]..with no central pillar, leaving a marvellous method of ventilation, without the usual accompanying draughts? [Not the same for any rear seat passengers, I have been told]....which can be adjusted by judicious positioning of the quarter light window too...Someone put some serious thought into keeping the driver cool on those blistering California days?

The downside to my hanging my elbow out the window is, for my left hand to be on the rim of the wheel, the wrist has to adopt a bit of an odd angle. But that just might be me?
_________________
Dellow Mk2, 1951 built, reg 1952.
Ford Mustang coupe, 1967, 6 cylinder auto.
Fiat 126 BIS
Cannon special [1996 registered. Built in 1950's]
----------------------------------------------
Ford Pop chassis, Ashley 1172 bodyshell, in pieces.
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alastairq



Joined: 14 Oct 2016
Posts: 1541
Location: East Yorkshire

PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2021 1:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Elbow in the breeze?
Just remembered, when driving my Dellow, there is absolutely nowhere else my elbow, or indeed, my whole arm and a lot of my right shoulder, can go other than outside the door line...Well & truly!
_________________
Dellow Mk2, 1951 built, reg 1952.
Ford Mustang coupe, 1967, 6 cylinder auto.
Fiat 126 BIS
Cannon special [1996 registered. Built in 1950's]
----------------------------------------------
Ford Pop chassis, Ashley 1172 bodyshell, in pieces.
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