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Austin A40 Devon pickup
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Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 386

PostPosted: Thu Mar 11, 2021 9:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just remembered an S/steel application that didn't work so well for me.
Back in the 1980s my-ride-to-work was a 1959 Royal Enfield Bullet. I replaced the bolts that secured the front mudguard to the alloy front fork sliders with s/s bolts.
After a while, out in all weather, the threads in the cast alloy parts turned to dust due to electorlytic corrosion.
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alastairq



Joined: 14 Oct 2016
Posts: 1541
Location: East Yorkshire

PostPosted: Fri Mar 12, 2021 12:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As an aside..................on my Daihatsu 4trak Indywreck, [and on all others] the rear light units are[were?] secured with SS screws. Into ordinary [not very mild?] steel [bumpers].

One expects, as doubtless Daihatsu did, that SS screws wouldn't seize up. But, seize up they do, resulting in damaged lenses when simply changing a bulb.

There are only so many repairs using superglue one can make to the lenses, before the MoT person complains.
I solved the issue [and the expense of frequently buying new lenses] by fitting a steel back plate, and seeking out some [cheap] trailer lenses that fitted into the recesses.

On my Morgan 4/4 [1939 ] which has long since gone elsewhere, the drag link had been renewed using SS bar [threaded too], which looked very smart and professionally done. I found it used to flex alarmingly unless the tyres were over inflated. It was replaced by a link made of original type material, eventually.
_________________
Dellow Mk2, 1951 built, reg 1952.
Ford Mustang coupe, 1967, 6 cylinder auto.
Fiat 126 BIS
Cannon special [1996 registered. Built in 1950's]
----------------------------------------------
Ford Pop chassis, Ashley 1172 bodyshell, in pieces.
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Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 386

PostPosted: Sat Mar 13, 2021 2:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Finished the repairs to the 2 bottom corners of my cab and done a temporary paint job just to protect it.
I epoxy primered onto the steel/lead. Then bit of filler where required to fill the imperfections, followed by 2 more coats of primer.
As Penguin45 suggested I sealed this with a topcoat. I had a bit of gloss black epoxy in the garage so used that. The black obviously looked terrible on a green car so I quickly sprayed 1 thin cellulose coat of green to match the rest of the vehicle.
The temporary thin green layer will come off quickly with a rub when it is time for the respray.




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Penguin45



Joined: 28 Jul 2014
Posts: 345
Location: Padiham

PostPosted: Sun Mar 14, 2021 10:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That looks pretty good to my eye.
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'67 Wolseley MkI 18/85, '70 Austin MkII 1800 The Landcrab Forum.
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Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 386

PostPosted: Tue Mar 16, 2021 9:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had to go on a 50 mile errand today so took the truck. After a while I became aware that something was different. I realised that it was a lot quieter in the cab. I could actually hear myself humming.
I had removed the wooden carrying frame (or whatever its called) between the cab and load bed(!) the other day when I was doing the bodywork.
This has resulted in a reduction of wind noise.
So, it's much improved and I think it looks better without it, so it's not going back on again.And if course I won't be lugging great heavy hardwood goalposts around with me either, so thats got to be good too.
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Rootes75



Joined: 30 Apr 2013
Posts: 3149
Location: The Somerset Levels

PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2021 12:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think that repair looks pretty good.

Don't blame you leaving the wood out to reduce the noise either!
_________________
1937 Ford 7w
1937 Hillman 80
1946 ERF C.I.5
1947 Hillman Minx
1955 Hillman Minx Mk8
1950 Commer R541
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Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 386

PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2021 9:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've just made a big improvement to my truck. I've been driving around for the last year with a really badly scratched windscreen. Driving into the sun was terrible. I removed it and took it to my local windscreen place and they cut me a new one ( it's a flat sheet) and ground the edges for 60.00 pounds. What a difference! It's like there's nothing there now compared to the old thing.
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alastairq



Joined: 14 Oct 2016
Posts: 1541
Location: East Yorkshire

PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2021 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Miken wrote:
I've just made a big improvement to my truck. I've been driving around for the last year with a really badly scratched windscreen. Driving into the sun was terrible. I removed it and took it to my local windscreen place and they cut me a new one ( it's a flat sheet) and ground the edges for 60.00 pounds. What a difference! It's like there's nothing there now compared to the old thing.


Splendid!

Did you take the opportunity to have them cut it from automotive-thickness laminated glass? Smile
_________________
Dellow Mk2, 1951 built, reg 1952.
Ford Mustang coupe, 1967, 6 cylinder auto.
Fiat 126 BIS
Cannon special [1996 registered. Built in 1950's]
----------------------------------------------
Ford Pop chassis, Ashley 1172 bodyshell, in pieces.
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Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 386

PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2021 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

alastairq wrote:
Miken wrote:
I've just made a big improvement to my truck. I've been driving around for the last year with a really badly scratched windscreen. Driving into the sun was terrible. I removed it and took it to my local windscreen place and they cut me a new one ( it's a flat sheet) and ground the edges for 60.00 pounds. What a difference! It's like there's nothing there now compared to the old thing.


Splendid!

Did you take the opportunity to have them cut it from automotive-thickness laminated glass? Smile


Yes, it is proper windscreen glass.
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Vulgalour



Joined: 08 May 2018
Posts: 306
Location: Kent

PostPosted: Sun Apr 04, 2021 12:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a lovely old truck. New windscreens are just magic when you've been squinting through a scratched old one, allows you to enjoy the rest of the car so much more.
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Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 386

PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 2021 10:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I broke down today. I had pulled into a country layby this morning and switched off the engine. When I re started it there was a horrible loud buzzing noise coming from the engine. The starter motor pinion was stuck in mesh with the flywheel ring gear. I tried rocking the car in gear and turning the square end of the motor shaft with a spanner to no avail.
I was wondering what to do next when a man in a van with "Mobile Mechanic" written on the side pulled up. He asked me what the problem was and after helping me push it to a car park on the other side of the road he ended up helping me to remove the starter. The gear pinion/bendix assembly was completely locked up hard in the engaged position. We used 2 Mole grips to free it off. I didn't want to risk putting it back in without a good check over, So he helped me bump start the car so I could drive home.
I was very grateful to a helpful stranger. He refused my offer of payment.
Fortunately I managed to get home without stalling it (I had also left my starter handle at home for some reason).
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Farmer John



Joined: 18 Feb 2010
Posts: 181
Location: Manawatu NZ

PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 5:08 am    Post subject: A40 truck Reply with quote

Hello Miken, you have made a top-class job of the restoration of your Austin!
My hugely experienced foreman always told us to lever the starter away from the block with a big screwdriver while tightening the starter bolts. Uses all the tolerances in the mounting bolts to your advantage. Whatever else you do to the drive, do this when reassembling.
You will know which spanners to take next time, thats good.
John
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Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 386

PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 10:37 pm    Post subject: Re: A40 truck Reply with quote

Farmer John wrote:
Hello Miken, you have made a top-class job of the restoration of your Austin!
My hugely experienced foreman always told us to lever the starter away from the block with a big screwdriver while tightening the starter bolts. Uses all the tolerances in the mounting bolts to your advantage. Whatever else you do to the drive, do this when reassembling.
You will know which spanners to take next time, thats good.
John


Thanks John a good tip about the lever.
I actually had the correct size spanners with me. I was reluctant to tackle the job by the side of the road because the lower bolt that holds the starter in position is difficult to reach without jacking up the car and crawling underneath. Fortunately, when the chap who helped me turned up he had a trolley jack and pair of ramps in his van so we were able to get under it safely.
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Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 386

PostPosted: Sun Apr 25, 2021 8:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like building models. Some of them can be quite large and heavy.
With the lifting of covid restrictions I hope to be able to get back to steam engine driving again later this year.
The last week Ive had the welder out again and Ive been working on this arrangement to hopefully reduce a lot of the heavy lifting and shifting so my truck can start doing some useful work and get my locos to the railway (about 3 miles away).







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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 4215
Location: Derby

PostPosted: Sun Apr 25, 2021 10:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's amazing!

Where did you learn to build models like that ?
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