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Oh dear a breakdown
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old iron



Joined: 22 Mar 2016
Posts: 143

PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 2021 4:52 pm    Post subject: Oh dear a breakdown Reply with quote

Decided to give Austin 16/6 a bit of exercise last week, very happy bumbling along at a sedate 40mph or so. Thirty mile journey out to the tow bar fitters and then return home using the A14 as it was early lunchtime and not overly busy. All is fine until the engine gave a cough , and then another which developed into the engine dying.
Unfortunately I couldn’t quite make the next lay-by which was another 200 yards way Rolling Eyes Stuck in the nearside of A14very unpleasant indeed, to add to my woes I discovered that I had forgotten to renew my breakdown cover Embarassed Embarassed
A disaster in the making, fortunately the police arrived and towed me into the lay-by and relative safety for all road users. I told them I had contacted my lad who will tow me home Where is home they asked and I told them. No No No they said that is to far and to dangerous, you can use these
people who will recover you and drop you home. At that point I that I’m in a quandary here and the police r-iterated no towing! if we see you we will be looking for offences commited whilst be towed. In fairness they were being safety conscious as would be expected. And off they went to other duties.
Half hour passed nd I thought ry the engine see if it fires up, it did instantly!!
Another half hour and my lad didn’t show up, he said it’s to dodgy to tow the car on the A14 . I decided to drive and hope looking at the back roads home.
Three or four miles nd then the car starts to splutter again, draw off the road, car cools down and off we go again, rinse repeat until I got home.
Turned out to be the he electric fuel pump failed, overheat and pack up, cool
down and run, heats up rinse repeat.
All part of vintage motoring, new fuel pump arrived today Very Happy
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Rick
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Joined: 27 Apr 2005
Posts: 21779
Location: UK

PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 2021 4:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glad to read that you got home aok, at least you had a bit of "can do" spirit about you!!

RJ
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norustplease



Joined: 11 Apr 2011
Posts: 659
Location: Lancashire

PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Had a similar experience the other day in the Traction. Set off for a drive up the Ribble valley to Ribchester to meet a couple of old car friends. Had a chat, a coffee and a sandwich in the garden of a nice little cafe nearby and set out to return home. Things had become a little jerky on the last part of the outward trip, so checked and found a loose battery terminal which i tightened up. However, the symptoms became worse after a short distance on the return trip. Inspection under the bonnet by the roadside showed no visible issues, and so I hiccupped off again. The car started and idled fine, but any accelerator movement whilst on the move produced a massive hesitation and sometimes a spit back through the carb.
After a short distance I decided this was a fuel issue and I pulled the choke out slightly. Miraculously the symptoms almost disappeared and on half choke, the car drove normally, albeit with a rather faster than normal tickover. So obviously a very weak mixture was the cause, and I suspected a blockage in the carb somewhere, possibly the main jet.
Removed the carb the following day to find several mm of fine amber sediment in the bottom of the float chamber and elsewhere in the various passageways of the carburettor (a Solex 32PBIC).
Is this our old friend E5 at work, possibly the sediment being part of the lining of the under bonnet fuel pipe that burst several months ago?
In the process of cleaning the carburettor out and will refit later today, hopefully cured.
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lowdrag



Joined: 10 Apr 2009
Posts: 1443
Location: Le Mans

PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 2:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anyone with experience of the SU electric pump always carries a spare! One of the things I learned very early on in my Jaguar history. And an in-line brake switch, and an oil pressure sender, and, and and..............
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old iron



Joined: 22 Mar 2016
Posts: 143

PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 3:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

lowdrag wrote:
Anyone with experience of the SU electric pump always carries a spare! One of the things I learned very early on in my Jaguar history. And an in-line brake switch, and an oil pressure sender, and, and and..............


Ah, a very common problem then, just fitted the new pump today and the car ran as it should, hear the pump though working away quite hard. New pump with VAT & delivery is £125. I think I will take your advise and order another along with a new coil.
My previous vintage cars have been good old autovac or in the A7 direct feed from the scuttle fuel tank. These damned modern conveniences such as electric pump Very Happy
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old iron



Joined: 22 Mar 2016
Posts: 143

PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 3:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reading of ‘norustplese’ experience, are there any additives that can be used with the E5 petrol ?
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peter scott



Joined: 18 Dec 2007
Posts: 6575
Location: Edinburgh

PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 3:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't think there is anything that you can add to E5 fuel to remove its problems.

"The most critical problems caused by ethanol fuel blends are water contamination and fuel separation, both of which happen during storage. This process is sped up when the fuel is allowed to “breath” to the atmosphere and the ethanol is given the chance to absorb moisture from the air.
Whilst a small amount of water in the fuel might not cause an issue, if the machine is left in storage for a longer period, the fuel can absorb moisture to a point where it cannot be held in suspension any longer and phase separation will occur. This will appear as a bubble or layer of water which will sit below the fuel in the fuel tank. This ethanol-water mix is very corrosive and will not allow the engine to run if it is sucked into the fuel system. If this happens within the carburettor of the machine, it can leave behind gummy deposits which can block ports in the carburettor when the fuel evaporates. Sometimes this can be resolved by simply removing the carburettor and giving it a clean but more often than not, a new carburettor may be the only solution."

Peter.

p.s. A cheaper option than carrying a spare SU pump is just to carry a few square inches of fine wet and dry paper.
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alastairq



Joined: 14 Oct 2016
Posts: 1541
Location: East Yorkshire

PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 6:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To those who feel today's basic 95 octane petrol is the devil in disguise [wait until we get E10, or E25, eh?] could do worse than read the book in the link below...which is chapter & verse, tested, concerning modern petrol versus 1960's petrol.
https://www.veloce.co.uk/store/Classic-Engines-Modern-Fuel-The-Problems-the-Solutions-p151478624

Of course, if all old car fuel lines haven't been renewed at least twice in the past 20 years, then something needs to be done toot sweet?
Modern rubber fuel line will likely be ethanol-proof, even eBay stuff.

https://classicenginesmodernfuel.org.uk/Clubs/ModernFuel/BulletinBoard/Default.aspx?dyn_menu_useclub=1000001&dyn_menu_mainmenu=5

Above is a link to the online bulletin board run by the author of the above book.

Within the various questions will be found the scientifically proved answers to many of the problems old vehicle users experience with today's petrol.

I am sure Paul won't mind me promoting his efforts in this respect?
Suffice to say, I look forward to trying E10 in my Ford sidevalve engine.

For electric fuel pumps, if running & driving is more important than absolute originality, then I have found the Facet solid state fuel pumps to be unbeatable...in terms of price, and reliability. They cost nothing like as much as the more complex [and bulky] SU types.

Plus, most Facets are better off mounted close to the fuel tank, as they tend to be pushers rather than suckers.
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MVPeters



Joined: 28 Aug 2008
Posts: 756
Location: Northern MA, USA

PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 6:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

p.s. A cheaper option than carrying a spare SU pump is just to carry a few square inches of fine wet and dry paper.[/quote]

or a hammer.........
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Penman



Joined: 23 Nov 2007
Posts: 4335
Location: Lancashire

PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi
MVPeters wrote:
p.s. A cheaper option than carrying a spare SU pump is just to carry a few square inches of fine wet and dry paper.


or a hammer.........[/quote]

I found that the Mini's wheel brace did the job quite well.
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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 4210
Location: Derby

PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 7:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

alastairq wrote:
To those who feel today's basic 95 octane petrol is the devil in disguise [wait until we get E10, or E25, eh?] could do worse than read the book in the link below...which is chapter & verse, tested, concerning modern petrol versus 1960's petrol.
https://www.veloce.co.uk/store/Classic-Engines-Modern-Fuel-The-Problems-the-Solutions-p151478624

Of course, if all old car fuel lines haven't been renewed at least twice in the past 20 years, then something needs to be done toot sweet?
Modern rubber fuel line will likely be ethanol-proof, even eBay stuff.

https://classicenginesmodernfuel.org.uk/Clubs/ModernFuel/BulletinBoard/Default.aspx?dyn_menu_useclub=1000001&dyn_menu_mainmenu=5

Above is a link to the online bulletin board run by the author of the above book.

Within the various questions will be found the scientifically proved answers to many of the problems old vehicle users experience with today's petrol.

I am sure Paul won't mind me promoting his efforts in this respect?


I should think Paul would be delighted with any additional publicity for his book - considering the worthy cause is is helping to support.

https://ttypes.org/classic-engines-modern-fuel-helping-children-in-tanzania/
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old iron



Joined: 22 Mar 2016
Posts: 143

PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 10:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MVPeters wrote:
p.s. A cheaper option than carrying a spare SU pump is just to carry a few square inches of fine wet and dry paper.


or a hammer.........[/quote]

I am going back 35 years now, my morry 1000 conked out , a very very rare occurance. A pal said to me hit the pump with a bit of wood!
I did and heard the pump click click click. And away I went driving home.
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lowdrag



Joined: 10 Apr 2009
Posts: 1443
Location: Le Mans

PostPosted: Sat Apr 17, 2021 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

old iron wrote:
lowdrag wrote:
Anyone with experience of the SU electric pump always carries a spare! One of the things I learned very early on in my Jaguar history. And an in-line brake switch, and an oil pressure sender, and, and and..............


Ah, a very common problem then, just fitted the new pump today and the car ran as it should, hear the pump though working away quite hard. New pump with VAT & delivery is £125. I think I will take your advise and order another along with a new coil.
My previous vintage cars have been good old autovac or in the A7 direct feed from the scuttle fuel tank. These damned modern conveniences such as electric pump Very Happy


I wouldn't bother ordering a new spare. In the old days it was the points that stopped working, and as said a tap with a 7/8th AF would often get it starting again. Here at home I have often had people come here panicking that they can't get home because the pump/brake light switch/whatever has failed, and I keep such things as carburettor gaskets and all. But anyway, the new pumps come with electronics, not points, and don't fail. Also, the last time I helped someone out the pump he sent me in replacement was one that not only was electronic but also could automatically recognize positive or negative earth. Best of both worlds then, since Jaguar changed in 1964 and one pump now fits all.
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old iron



Joined: 22 Mar 2016
Posts: 143

PostPosted: Mon May 10, 2021 1:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Out for a drive yesterday, new shiny SU fuel pump fitted and covered about 150 miles since fitting. Pootling along at a steady 40/45 mph and the dreaded
spluttering of the engine leading to another breakdown Embarassed
This time I had a good idea what to do and tapped the SU fuel pump a few times and then heard it started to work again. Off I go to continue my journey.
Question is this is a new fuel pump, surely I should expect it to perform well for at least a few years ??

Considering contacting SU.
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ukdave2002



Joined: 23 Nov 2007
Posts: 3665
Location: South Cheshire

PostPosted: Mon May 10, 2021 2:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

old iron wrote:
Out for a drive yesterday, new shiny SU fuel pump fitted and covered about 150 miles since fitting. Pootling along at a steady 40/45 mph and the dreaded
spluttering of the engine leading to another breakdown Embarassed
This time I had a good idea what to do and tapped the SU fuel pump a few times and then heard it started to work again. Off I go to continue my journey.
Question is this is a new fuel pump, surely I should expect it to perform well for at least a few years ??

Considering contacting SU.
It will be the throw set a tad to tight, if you knock it back by one "screw" it should be fine & take less time than to send it back to Burlen Smile .

Dave
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