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What did you do to your car today?
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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 3375
Location: Derby

PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2020 7:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ran into an unexpected problem when trying to re fit the oil pump today. The body and head of the pump are fastened to the block by 8 long M6 bolts (in 3 different lengths!). After fitting the pump I found it impossible to turn the camshaft. With the cylinder head off, it should turn freely and drive the oil pump shaft.

The p.o. had fitted a paper gasket under the pump head. It shouldn't have one so I had left it off. This was the cause of the problem and can only be resolved by following the instructions published by MOSS - who suggest removing the two gears and shaving material from their top ends until I can get a 0.002" clearance using plastigauge.
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Rootes75



Joined: 30 Apr 2013
Posts: 2873
Location: The Somerset Levels

PostPosted: Sun Feb 23, 2020 1:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Finally finished clearing space in our shed for the 55 Hillman, we towed her from our house to the shed (about 1 mile) using a towing bar. Easy as you like.

My 8 year old came with us and he did all the steering while we did the pushing to get her back in the space. She is now sat in the shed nice and dry and away from prying eyes!

We had a chap knock on the door Friday asking what was under the sheet and whatever it was could he buy it etc. My wife was in and she told him very little about it. We have been having a lot of thefts in the village recently.
_________________
1937 Ford 7w
1937 Hillman 80
1946 ERF C.I.5
1947 Hillman Minx
1955 Hillman Minx Mk8
1950 Commer R541
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MikeEdwards



Joined: 25 May 2011
Posts: 1896
Location: South Cheshire

PostPosted: Sun Feb 23, 2020 7:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tried to start the car today, having left it a few weeks since I changed the choke disc and cleaned the valves out. It did seem to start more quickly, but I have still to get used to the choke - I tried with a small amount of choke, and had no luck, so tried more. Unfortunately that allows it to start and rev quite highly, long before the oil pressure comes up.

But I definitely think it's starting better than before, so I'm going to put that down as fixed.
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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 3375
Location: Derby

PostPosted: Sun Feb 23, 2020 9:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Having packed up the oil pump ready to post off to the engineers for machining, I decided to do the valve timing. The new sprockets come sans any timing marks and the new camshaft timing is different from original. I bought a timing disc but it would need modification to fit on the crankshaft and besides the new timing chain is of an endless type which means it needs to be fitted to both sprockets and the assembly then fitted to the crank and camshafts simultaneously thus making adjustments can be tiresome.


As the head is yet to be fitted I decided to prepare the valve timing by using the tappets. First, I established TDC on No.1 cylinder. I then arranged for the inlet valve tappet to be at it's maximum lift.
Fortunately, when secured by it's key way the crankshaft sprocket has a tooth pointing truly vertically. I was able to confirm this alignment with a set square over the edge of the block centrally aligned with the piston. I then red marked the tooth and removed the sprocket.

I laid the timing disk on the bench and drew a line across the middle of it from the 106 degrees ATDC point (so it met the 74 deg. on the other side). I then placed the crank sprocket carefully on the middle of the timing disc so that the line bisected it and then rotated the sprocket so that the TDC marked tooth aligned with the 106 degrees line.

I then red marked the tooth that pointed to the TDC (zero) line on the disc.

When assembled on the crank with the original marked tooth pointing to TDC I turned the engine over until the second marked tooth pointed to the TDC position. This meant that when both sprockets were linked with the timing chain, the valve timing should be set at 106 degrees after TDC as per specification.

Once the head is on I will double check the valve timing using a dial gauge but I believe it should be O.K. because the engine uses a timing chain and you need to be really careless to be a whole tooth out.

I am tempted to invest in an adjustable camshaft sprocket so as to get the timing "spot on" but that's probably going too far for a non race tuned engine.
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norustplease



Joined: 11 Apr 2011
Posts: 618
Location: Lancashire

PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2020 4:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A few weeks ago on a rare sunny afternoon, I decided to spring the 2Cv from its hibernation in my daughter's garage and go for a brisk drive round.
Alas the electrics were totally dead, and even my pocket jump starter would not get it to fire, since it only offers about 30 seconds of boost at a time, not enough time to get the fuel back up from the tank. Disappointing, although to be fair, the booster instructions say that it will not start a car with a totally flat battery.
I was also baffled about why the car could have discharged its battery. This was virtually new, and the car does not have anything that stays alive in the background once the ignition is turned off.
So, back for spanners, to whip off the battery.
Back at base, my so called SMART charger was baffled and flashed lights without actually doing anything. I consulted fellow car enthusiasts and was told to dig out my old steam powered charger, set it to a low rate and then leave it hooked up for a couple of days.
This seemed to do the trick and once fully charged, I left it for a few days longer and then tested it. It had held the charge.

Today I went back to the garage and put the battery back on. Of course I had the wrong sized spanner for the clamp, and had nothing suitable in the car's own toolbox, but I hooked it up anyway and.....the interior light came on! That explains the discharge!
I freed it up with a few turns of the starting handle, sprayed some starter spray into the air intake and turned the key. After a prolonged spell of cranking, presumably to refill the carb float chamber again, she fired and we were off, well the engine ran happily anyway. Of course without a battery clamp in place, I could not sensibly take it for a drive!

Do-oh!!!

I left it on a fast idle to warm through whilst I rumaged in the garage. Please let there be some decent weather soon!!!
Also make a note to put an 8mm spanner into the car's toolkit.
_________________
1953 Citroen Traction
1964 Volvo PV544
1986 Renault 4
1990 Citroen 2CV
Boring Fiat 500X


Last edited by norustplease on Tue Feb 25, 2020 10:47 am; edited 1 time in total
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alastairq



Joined: 14 Oct 2016
Posts: 1310
Location: East Yorkshire

PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2020 5:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Drain-back, or evaporation , [whichever] of fuel from the flat chamber, is an issue I have with the alt Mustang....if the battery feels like it, many seconds of churning of starter gets fuel back up, and firing is then instant.

I am tempted to fit a [cheapo, of course...pensioner's rules apply!]...electric fuel pump...probably near to the tank...with a separate switch....then I could switch the pump on, fill the fuel system, before turning it off, then starting the engine, which uses the mechanical pump.

I Presume most electric pumps [well, mine, anyway....moprods, Facets, Hucos, etc.] will allow fuel through without being switched on?]....is this the way of things to come? {Modern petrol, old mechanical pumps?]

Manual primers not present, I should add
_________________
Dellow Mk2, 1951 built, reg 1952.
Ford Mustang coupe, 1967, 6 cylinder auto.
Fiat 126 BIS
Cannon special [1996 registered. Built in 1950's]
----------------------------------------------
Ford Pop chassis, Ashley 1172 bodyshell, in pieces.
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MikeEdwards



Joined: 25 May 2011
Posts: 1896
Location: South Cheshire

PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2020 6:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If it's draining back, wouldn't a one-way valve in the fuel line sort it out?

I can't think how it would drain back from the float chamber, though. I wondered if I was having a similar issue (car takes ages to start when it's stood for a few weeks) but when I took the float chamber off one carb, it was still full.
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alastairq



Joined: 14 Oct 2016
Posts: 1310
Location: East Yorkshire

PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2020 7:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think the volatility of today's petrol leads to evaporation via heat soak....down to a certain level.....?

I also think the fuel that lays in the line gets either sucked back to the tank, or simply evaporates away...The mechanical pump has a non return valve....but I have a clear filter in the line, before the pump...and I noted that, when parked up, the filter is pretty much full....but over a few weeks of inactivity, the level of fuel visible in the filter drops...

I don't really get this problem with the Dellow, which has an electric fuel pump..
_________________
Dellow Mk2, 1951 built, reg 1952.
Ford Mustang coupe, 1967, 6 cylinder auto.
Fiat 126 BIS
Cannon special [1996 registered. Built in 1950's]
----------------------------------------------
Ford Pop chassis, Ashley 1172 bodyshell, in pieces.
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norustplease



Joined: 11 Apr 2011
Posts: 618
Location: Lancashire

PostPosted: Tue Feb 25, 2020 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think that in my case it was simple evaporation. The car hasn't been run since mid December. Previously, after prolonged layup, I put some fresh petrol in a jamjar, pull off the fuel feed pipe from the float chamber and with a small funnel and a short length of fuel pipe fill up the float chamber. This usually results in an instant start.

The Traction has an electric pump. it is surprising how long this pumps for before going quiet, signifying that the float chamber has filled up. However, the plus side is that starts are usually fairly painless.

The Volvo, I just get in and turn the key!
_________________
1953 Citroen Traction
1964 Volvo PV544
1986 Renault 4
1990 Citroen 2CV
Boring Fiat 500X
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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 3375
Location: Derby

PostPosted: Tue Feb 25, 2020 11:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

norustplease wrote:

The Volvo, I just get in and turn the key!


That's Volvo for you!

Are they still good cars these days?
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norustplease



Joined: 11 Apr 2011
Posts: 618
Location: Lancashire

PostPosted: Tue Feb 25, 2020 3:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have owned Amazons, several 140 series, a 164, a couple of 240 series and a 940 but never owned a modern Volvo. Most modern cars are pretty reliable these days, compared to how things were in 1964, and I would imagine that Volvo are as good as any. Looking on the web found the following:
'In their 2019 study, ReliabilityIndex gave Volvo a score of 127, which placed the manufacturer in 23rd place on their list of 40 brands. This places them between MINI and Vauxhall in the 2019 rankings. When it comes to other areas of reliability, Volvo fares a little better. Looking at the amount of time Volvo models spend off the road, the manufacturer places 13 out of 40, with the average time spent off the road being just over 2 hours, which is rather impressive.'
So not bad. What puts me off owning another, is the price, I don't think that they are the same value for money that their cars were back in the nineteen eighties.
_________________
1953 Citroen Traction
1964 Volvo PV544
1986 Renault 4
1990 Citroen 2CV
Boring Fiat 500X
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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 3375
Location: Derby

PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 2020 1:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I painted white enamel on two of the new timing chain links so that it would be easier to retain valve timing in the future. The white links align with scribed lines which I copied from the old sprockets onto the new ones. This is similar to how the XPAG timing would have been saved originally.

As can be seen, on one side of the bright links there are 13 dark links and 15 dark links the other side. Should these alignment marks be over shot, however, the engine would have to be turned over 20 times for them to return to their original positions.!

I fitted a new spring in the hydraulic chain tensioner and on recent advice fitted a fibre washer behind the head. This is apparently a source of annoying tapping sounds which can now be avoided.



Having just re fitted the head, I notice that the new rocker shaft is 1" shorter than the old one!. Fortunately, the key ways are in the same places so perhaps it will all fit O.K.

Starting with the most worn tappet adjuster screw, I removed the nut but found the screw wouldn't come out of the rocker; it must have a damaged/stretched thread. Before cutting off the ball end to enable it to be removed through the top, I thought I would check that the old tappet adjuster nut would fit the new screw. It did so I am cutting off the ends.
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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 3375
Location: Derby

PostPosted: Thu Feb 27, 2020 1:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So I had to chop off the ends of 6 of the 8 tappet adjuster screws to get them out of the rockers. I know I should refrain from ranting about the previous owner but frankly I could sometimes swear!.. Why would anyone force a UNF nut onto a M8x1mm thread on an XPAG engine? Surely no one would attempt to reassemble one of these engines and fail to realise that they are strewn with an obsolete "metric" thread?

One of the tappet adjuster nuts must have become lost and been replaced with a UNF nut with a butchered thread. As all the other fasteners were half nuts I felt it would look better if they were all the same so I ground down a castellated (M8x1) full nut to match.

I then noticed a problem with the alignment of the rockers and the push rods. I presumed the slightly shorter shaft was to blame but maybe not. I spent a considerable amount of time searching through thousands of assorted washers to find a suitable distance piece and eventually had success.

The rocker assembly is now bolted down to the head. One design quirk I have noticed is that the rocker shaft assembly will need to be removed when it comes to tightening the head down after initial running.... "oh bother"!...or similar! Surprised
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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 3375
Location: Derby

PostPosted: Thu Feb 27, 2020 5:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Turning my attention to something else; I decided to remove the fan pulley and fit it to the new water pump. I don't know why but I was surprised to find the woodruff key was missing from the shaft. I found the key squashed between the pulley and the bearing. Presumably the car had been driven like this.

The fan would have been working but with the water pump left idle, the engine would probably have overheated. Very Happy

I will be replacing the original 4 blade fan with an efficient electric one and the old water pump replaced with an upgraded new one as more under bonnet air is needed when running a supercharger.
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Rootes75



Joined: 30 Apr 2013
Posts: 2873
Location: The Somerset Levels

PostPosted: Sun Mar 01, 2020 2:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now our 55 Minx is in the shed we spent the morning removing the partially stripped sidevalve engine. She was seized when we bought her many years back and we managed to unseize the pistons and remove them a year or two ago.

We decided now though that removing the complete engine is the best idea so that we can rebuild it on the bench.

We are looking forward to finally getting some work done on her.
_________________
1937 Ford 7w
1937 Hillman 80
1946 ERF C.I.5
1947 Hillman Minx
1955 Hillman Minx Mk8
1950 Commer R541
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