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What did you do to your car today?
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MikeEdwards



Joined: 25 May 2011
Posts: 1867
Location: South Cheshire

PostPosted: Sun Mar 01, 2020 7:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ran the Firenza for a bit, as it's not run for some time now. Started OK, after a little encouragement. Also cut the remains of the sill off my Audi project, to get ready to fit the new one. There's a little bit of repair needed on the inner sill / floor edge and the internal strengthener, before I can do that.
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Rick
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Apr 2005
Posts: 21024
Location: North-west UK

PostPosted: Mon Mar 02, 2020 3:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Updates such as these are always appreciated, and help keep any forum (not just this one) going.

While we're on the subject, it's odd, many new joiners list the interesting old vehicles they're working on when they request to join, yet once set up with a login, never post. I assume they're just joining so as to PM an existing member about something or other. It's a shame really.

RJ
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Rick (OCC Admin)
Various 1920s-1960s - Austin, Morris, Commer, Dodge etc.
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norustplease



Joined: 11 Apr 2011
Posts: 611
Location: Lancashire

PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2020 5:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Most forums seem to have a core of people who are active, will respond to queries, and update on their own activities. The silent remainder just seem content to sit and watch. I find it particularly disappointing when someone comes on board with a project that never gets beyond the first couple of posts.
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1953 Citroen Traction
1964 Volvo PV544
1986 Renault 4
1990 Citroen 2CV
Boring Fiat 500X
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HealeyV8



Joined: 17 Oct 2019
Posts: 5
Location: Croydon Surrey

PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2020 6:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I myself like reading interesting posts. I try to use my Healey every weekend even through the winter. Usually there is some niggling thing or another that needs doing or a small upgrade. Just not sure others would find it interesting.
So here goes a few of things.
Small upgrade got some Ring Roadrunner rectangular driving lamps and fitted them with relays to improve the lighting.
Niggle got back from a run with the guys last week and the adjustable capillary thermostatic fan controller had packed up, I ony replaced it a year ago, so I ordered another one, a tenner, and fitted it. I tested the old one on the car last week and although it clicked it didn't pass current through, except on the always on execpt when above zero terminal. Now I thought I test it with my tester and in continuity mode it appear to work so I don't know why it wouldn't work switiching the fan on in situe????
Last niggle and bodge, on my steering column there is a metal collar with 2 holes at top that is used to bolt to a bearing that the steering column goes through like the MGB and others the indicators and wiper stalk clamp to this.
My metal collar snapped so my stalks flop about and can't be used. Tried welding the collar it broke again soon after. So in true bodger style I found a jubilee clip of the required size slide this over what was left of collar and bearing, drilled a hole in jubilee clip to line up with hole in bearing. Clamped the whole lot together, so far so good I can use my indicators and wipers again.
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Jensen Healey
16 valves but 4 extra pistons
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Bitumen Boy



Joined: 26 Jan 2012
Posts: 1412
Location: Above the snow line in old Monmouthshire

PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2020 11:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nowt wrong with a jubilee clip, I've fixed all sorts of stuff with them that I bet the original designer never thought of...
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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 3294
Location: Derby

PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2020 12:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had previously prepped and painted the sump and timing chain cover so today I turned my attention to fitting them.

Once the surface was clean I fitted the sump gasket with Wellseal compound and after attaching the keyed double pulley together with the front oil seal I was about to fit the sump when it occurred to me that the oil seal (which is equally sandwiched between the front of the sump and the timing chain cover) would be too loose a fit in both housings. The reason for this is that originally, there would have been a graphite impregnated "rope" seal but these have been changed to a more reliable neoprene lip type seal but they are quite a bit narrower.

I will need to experiment with a filler of some sort; probably silicone sealant.

My plans were further frustrated when I realised the timing cover gasket I had been sent was the wrong one. Fortunately, I had some heavy duty lining paper left over from decorating. This is a strong paper and better, I felt, than the very thin gasket paper which I had to hand so I set about making my own gasket with it.

I taped the paper down on a flat surface and then sprayed black Hamerite paint onto the mating surface of the timing cover which I then flipped over and pressed down onto the paper. The bolt holes were then stamped into the template. I then cut out and stuck the new gasket to the cover with Wellseal compound.

These engines are particularly prone to leak oil so every detail is important in ensuring it stays dry. One such detail is where the sump gasket meets the front crank oil seal. Care needs to be taken to ensure that a tiny amount of gasket material is removed so that there is no "bunching" at this point. (Not too much cut away or it will defeat the object of the exercise.!)

Another detail is the neoprene seal itself. The seal works on the pulley shank surface which needs to be in good condition. Fortunately, mine is new. Tomorrow I will hopefully have the bottom end of the engine buttoned up and the water pump and thermostat housing fitted.
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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 3294
Location: Derby

PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2020 2:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When offering up the timing chain cover and sump to determine the best position in which to secure the crankshaft oil seal (front) I found that the castings will not quite line up. It is little wonder that the XPAG engine has a reputation for oil leaks!!


The protruding gasket edges will need cutting back.
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consul 57



Joined: 09 Nov 2017
Posts: 255
Location: somerset

PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2020 3:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ah precision engineering at it's best.
one thing modern cars seem to not do as much is leak oil all over the shop.
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Rick
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Apr 2005
Posts: 21024
Location: North-west UK

PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2020 3:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

consul 57 wrote:
ah precision engineering at it's best.
one thing modern cars seem to not do as much is leak oil all over the shop.


Tell that to the V8 Disco I had Wink

RJ
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Rick (OCC Admin)
Various 1920s-1960s - Austin, Morris, Commer, Dodge etc.
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alastairq



Joined: 14 Oct 2016
Posts: 1295
Location: East Yorkshire

PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2020 3:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

With our old[auld?] cars , there's no saying what past owners ...or their hired hands, did or did not do to these cars? Perhaps when the auld [old] MG left the factory, its sump & cover matched? But summat got swapped over the years?

I think what is often forgotten is, many old cars, over their lifetimes, did not receive the love and adoration to the same degree as we, today, expend on them?

At some stage in their past lives, they became bangers....then wrecks...?

When not -so-old[auld?]...if something broke, then a strapped-for-cash owner might fit whatever was cheap and to hand?

We are so quick to lay blame on ''previous owners'', tutting & frutting over what are seen as past bad practices?

Old MGs, especially, were very much a cheap option....hard to grasp when today they are ''worth'' the price of a small house?
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Dellow Mk2, 1951 built, reg 1952.
Ford Mustang coupe, 1967, 6 cylinder auto.
Fiat 126 BIS
Cannon special [1996 registered. Built in 1950's]
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Ford Pop chassis, Ashley 1172 bodyshell, in pieces.
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Rick
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Apr 2005
Posts: 21024
Location: North-west UK

PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2020 3:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

alastairq wrote:
...
Old MGs, especially, were very much a cheap option....hard to grasp when today they are ''worth'' the price of a small house?


And how many I wonder were re-engined, for example with a Ford Pop engine? I've a Practical Motorist magazine here somewhere that features such a conversion on its front cover.

RJ
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Rick (OCC Admin)
Various 1920s-1960s - Austin, Morris, Commer, Dodge etc.
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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 3294
Location: Derby

PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2020 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am assuming that when the original "rope seal" was installed it didn't matter that much if the edges didn't quite line up with each other but if you want to up grade to a rubber or neoprene lip seal it then becomes an issue.

Short term a dollop of silicone will hold back the oil but I prefer more of an engineering solution if possible. The difficulty is that the timing cover could be made to fit the sump but then there is an issue with the cover in the vertical plane where it bolts to the engine plate.

Simply put, if the holes line up in one direction then they are out in another. Evil or Very Mad
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MikeEdwards



Joined: 25 May 2011
Posts: 1867
Location: South Cheshire

PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2020 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

consul 57 wrote:
ah precision engineering at it's best.
one thing modern cars seem to not do as much is leak oil all over the shop.


Modern cars usually have plastic undertrays, that goes a long way to helping keep the drive clean.
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Ray White



Joined: 02 Dec 2014
Posts: 3294
Location: Derby

PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2020 8:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think it is the use of modern materials as much as anything that keeps oil where it should be.

I had no idea which rubber lip seals are which so I Googled it and this came up.
https://www.elastoproxy.com/nitrile-vs-neoprene-whats-the-difference/

I have no excuse. My Dad was a senior development engineer for James Walker & Co for many years and was in at the beginning. They churned out millions of the things.!
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alastairq



Joined: 14 Oct 2016
Posts: 1295
Location: East Yorkshire

PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2020 1:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rick wrote:
alastairq wrote:
...
Old MGs, especially, were very much a cheap option....hard to grasp when today they are ''worth'' the price of a small house?


And how many I wonder were re-engined, for example with a Ford Pop engine? I've a Practical Motorist magazine here somewhere that features such a conversion on its front cover.

RJ

I recall a side valve Ford engined MG of ancient years, being offered for sale, and receiving a shed lost of flak for not using the original engine.
Where as the original engines were fragile, highly strung, and at least this car was out and about, and driving.
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Dellow Mk2, 1951 built, reg 1952.
Ford Mustang coupe, 1967, 6 cylinder auto.
Fiat 126 BIS
Cannon special [1996 registered. Built in 1950's]
----------------------------------------------
Ford Pop chassis, Ashley 1172 bodyshell, in pieces.
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