classic car forum header
Classic cars forum & vehicle restoration.
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
How To Register     Posting Photographs     Privacy Policy     F/book facebook.com/oldclassiccar

Austin A40 Devon pickup
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Classic cars forum & vehicle restoration. Forum Index -> All our old cars, vans, lorries etc
Author Message
Penman



Joined: 23 Nov 2007
Posts: 4346
Location: Lancashire

PostPosted: Sun Apr 25, 2021 10:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi
5 inch or 7 and a half?
_________________
Bristols should always come in pairs.

Any 2 from:-
Straight 6
V8 V10
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Peter_L



Joined: 10 Apr 2008
Posts: 2634
Location: New Brunswick. Canada.

PostPosted: Sun Apr 25, 2021 11:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Marvellous ! both the Models and their Carrier.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 398

PostPosted: Mon Apr 26, 2021 6:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Penman wrote:
Hi
5 inch or 7 and a half?

They are 5" gauge. I did build a 7 1 /4" gauge once but it was too big and There is no track nearby. These 2 are heavy enough and are a good 2 man lift. Ive also built 6" to the foot scale traction engine which I registered and used to drive on the road but I sold that to buy the Austin. I built the green loco about 28 years ago. I must have driven it hundreds of miles and pulled thousands of passengers around Hove Park Railway over this time.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 398

PostPosted: Sun May 30, 2021 9:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

At last the weather has warmed up and dried up. I have decided to repair the 2 remaining rusty areas on my truck on both sides of the windscreen.
I attacked the right hand side with my angle grinder and this is what i found. Its horrible.
Im not a fabricator and I dont really know the best way to tackle this job, but ive always been of the opinion that if you dont know how to do something the right way, then do it the wrong way and learn from your mistakes.
I found the first problem is knowing when to stop grinding!



Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Farmer John



Joined: 18 Feb 2010
Posts: 184
Location: Manawatu NZ

PostPosted: Mon May 31, 2021 3:56 am    Post subject: A40 Reply with quote

Hi Mike I would like to make a suggestion or two to help with the body repair.
When replacing outer skin parts always prepare the replacement patch, whether hand formed or cut from a donor, before finally cutting out the rusty part. Use any sharp tool to discover the extent of the affected area leaving the shape unchanged and form the replacement or cut the donor part with plenty of overlap, using curves and no corners.
The important thing is to get this part ready before digging into the subframe. It is absolutely essential (to me anyway) that the various skins be "picked" apart by drilling spot welds, cutting fusion welds or removing whatever fasteners are present in each layer. Even if the piece comes out looking like a piece of frilly lace it will help you so much to form the replacement.
Use cardboard cut to the LHS curve to check your panel for accuracy, but I have an idea that you will know by the "feel" of a patch on top of a panel when it is right.
Gosh I am jumping around a bit! Once the outer patch is prepared it gets easier as the next layers are rarely complicated compound shapes, mostly pieces to be bent in the vice. They are important for strength but do not have to look pretty. If a part looks daunting think about making it in two or three pieces.
The cab corner you did turned out fine, I think you can do this OK.
Look forward to seeing your progress.
John
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Farmer John



Joined: 18 Feb 2010
Posts: 184
Location: Manawatu NZ

PostPosted: Mon May 31, 2021 4:33 am    Post subject: A40 Reply with quote

Mike, I have been studying your pictures closely and I think that if you make the "u" channel in pieces short enough that the curve is minimal, that should work OK. I am presuming that the gutter flange slips between the channel and the roof flange. How are these three pieces fixed together? From the picture there does not seem to be a lot of shape in the roof area that needs replacing so that is good.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 398

PostPosted: Mon May 31, 2021 5:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

John you are correct in your assumption of the construction. The vertical door aperture folds inward horizontally along the top. The roof panel comes down then bends back horizontally and the gutter strip is sandwiched between. The 3 layers are spot welded through. I can't do this as there is no way for me to gain access. I plan on repairing the roof and door aperture from the outside. Then making and attaching the gutter afterwards.
The best part about this job is that it's at a nice convenient height to work at.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Farmer John



Joined: 18 Feb 2010
Posts: 184
Location: Manawatu NZ

PostPosted: Mon May 31, 2021 10:14 am    Post subject: A40 Reply with quote

Miken you and I might not have a spot welder but would you consider using a panel adhesive? That would make refitting the components dead simple with the added advantage of being totally watertight, strong, and very simple to clamp together. It is a legitimate repair method.
John
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 398

PostPosted: Mon May 31, 2021 8:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I made and started to fit a repair panel today. It took flipping ages to make!
Its starts out as a sort of "Z" section that has to curve about all over the place to fit the door aperture.
Unconventionally I decided to make it from 1.5mm thick steel which is way thicker than normally used in car bodywork. Im glad I did because it allowed me to turn up the amps and apply a nice deep weld with my tig without it distorting. I could then lay into it with the grinder without fear of going through the metal. Being so thick, Its a really rigid little assembly.
I cut out all the old rusty metal and the last picture shows it in place and just held with a few small tack welds.
Ive now fully welded it and the door still closes, which is a good result.
Next job is to extend the frilly edges of the roof down to meet it.





Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Peter_L



Joined: 10 Apr 2008
Posts: 2634
Location: New Brunswick. Canada.

PostPosted: Mon May 31, 2021 10:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent work Miken,, I noticed your double threaded clamp in your photo, it took me back a good 50+ years when in 19 something-and-frozen-to-death, one would spend hours in metalwork/engineering class making the said items. Beautifully filed, absolutely square and carefully knurled grips that were then gently smoothed with emery paper.. Maybe, in a box, I may still have mine....
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 398

PostPosted: Tue Jun 01, 2021 8:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Today I made and tacked into place the roof and windscreen surround repair.
Just run out of argon so work has stopped temporarily.







Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 398

PostPosted: Wed Jun 09, 2021 9:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This went better than I was expecting. I fully welded the various patches in. After sanding the welds flush I lead filled where there was a bit of distortion and undulation.
I fabricated the new gutter section and reinstated it.





I chased the rust down a bit further than I expected and ended up repairing this bit as well.


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
petelang



Joined: 21 May 2009
Posts: 314
Location: Nottingham

PostPosted: Thu Jun 10, 2021 11:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lovely job. Wish I had the skills to do that sort of repair. If you feel like volunteering, I could keep you in work for a few months?
Peter
_________________
Daimler Fifteen 1934
Armstrong Siddeley 15 Long 1933
Daimler V8 250 196
Daimler DS420 's x 2
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 398

PostPosted: Thu Jun 10, 2021 10:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

petelang wrote:
If you feel like volunteering, I could keep you in work for a few months?
Peter


Oooh! Tempting offer. But no thanks.
I've got to do the same on the other side next.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bitumen Boy



Joined: 26 Jan 2012
Posts: 1507
Location: Above the snow line in old Monmouthshire

PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2021 2:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's looking really good. Nice work Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Classic cars forum & vehicle restoration. Forum Index -> All our old cars, vans, lorries etc All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Page 5 of 6

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Forum T&C


php BB powered © php BB Grp.