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Top Tips!
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Rick
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Joined: 27 Apr 2005
Posts: 21707
Location: UK

PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2007 9:05 am    Post subject: Top Tips! Reply with quote

I thought a thread just highlighting quick, top tips, that you've learnt from experiences running and working on older cars might be a good idea, eventually forming a list of handy hints. I'll kick things off with:

* photograph everything before, during and after stripdown, making notes as you go. A digi camera is perfect for this

* always wind a torque wrench back to zero after using it. Some readers will remember the fun I had with snapped head studs a while back Rolling Eyes

* never just rely on a trolley jack to hold a car up in the air - always use stands too!

* don't rush a job, it often ends in tears if you rush something and muck it up as a result

* try and have all the parts to hand that you think you'll need, prior to stripping a component down for refurbishment/cleaning etc

anyone care to add to this list?
Rick
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Rick (OCC Admin)
Various 1920s-1960s - Austin, Morris, Commer, Dodge etc.
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Uncle Joe
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2007 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll add six tips to this list. In no particular order:

1) Mak a a budget before you start.

2) Do as much research as possible on both the vehicle itself, and techniques needed.

3) Use LABELLED plastic bags or some other method to keep things together

4) Before you start, optimise your working area. Easier said than done, this one!

5) Make sure you have the proper safety equipment, AND USE IT!

6) As you are going along, list any parts that you need.

As Rick also said, dont rush. Work on the vehicle because you want to, not because you have to! More haste, less speed!

UJ
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Rick
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Joined: 27 Apr 2005
Posts: 21707
Location: UK

PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2007 3:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

* Don't throw anything away until you have a replacement to hand, that you know will fit. Even the tattiest bit of tatty trim can be used as a pattern to make up a new 'un. Equally if a new bit doesn't fit right, eg a waterpump, you can compare it with the old one to see where the difference is. If you've already chucked it, then it makes the job a bit more arduous.
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Rick (OCC Admin)
Various 1920s-1960s - Austin, Morris, Commer, Dodge etc.
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pigtin
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2007 5:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In my particular case; try to save enough energy and time to clear up and put tools away after each job. Sometimes I seem to spend as much time tiding up and looking lost tools as I spend on the original job. At the moment I have covered both cars in the garage, the floor and the workbench with bits and pieces. I dread clearing it up.

Don.
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buzzy bee
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2007 6:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi

I got through college, labling everything with tipex pens, probably wasn't meant to, but it got me top marks for the course, a triple Distinction. The next lot of students who got my machine would be miles ahead!

Cheers

Dave
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Brian M
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2007 9:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When between restorations or projects, (not that Rick knows that such a time exists!), put aside some time for maintenance on your equipment.

Change the oil in your compressor, carefully check your welder for efficient operation, oil your air tools, check the wiring on all electric tools and lamps etc.

Makes the work go more smoothly.

Quote:
UJ 1) Make a budget before you start.


Why bother? If you get the work done for less than you have in your bank that is great, but as we all know it is all the unforeseen costs that we will still finance to get the resto finished!
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Rick
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Joined: 27 Apr 2005
Posts: 21707
Location: UK

PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2007 10:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

* following on from Brian M - set a budget and timescale, then plan a contingency for when you double both!
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Rick (OCC Admin)
Various 1920s-1960s - Austin, Morris, Commer, Dodge etc.
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Rivet_101
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2007 11:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was just recently thinking the opposite about budget. I have decided not to work out what it has cost me. Here are my rules:

1 I will pay whatever I can afford at the time but endeavour to do whatever I can myself.

2 I will shop around.

3 I WILL finish the project, eventually....there is no question of funds budget stopping me. I have little money but lots of time.

4 Working out what I have spent will only depress me, so why do it?

What do people on a budget do when projects run over? Surely they don't stop?
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Rivet_101
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2007 11:35 pm    Post subject: hand washing Reply with quote

a mate came up with this and it is inspirational.

Don't clean your hands with expensive products. Just use a squeeze of washing up liquid and a small mound of sugar.....rub your hands together thoroughly, then rinse with water.

Sugar is a super abrasive, without being too rough or drying your hands out.
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Uncle Joe
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 7:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Budgets.

The are a couple of reasons for making a budget, not only to ensure that the job can be completed, but also to force a thorough inspection. Maybe there are a number of parts that are unobtainable for some reason, without which the job cant be finished?

How many times have we seen the term ''unfinished restoration'' in an advert? Bet there are a lot of reasons for that! Shocked

UJ
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Rick
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Joined: 27 Apr 2005
Posts: 21707
Location: UK

PostPosted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 8:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

* Remember, rust never sleeps Smile

* use a spot of copper grease on the steel studs when refitting an alloy thermostat housing to a cylinder head

* if a door window is slow to slide up and down within its furry guides, spray a little silicon grease into the guide to help ease things
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Rick (OCC Admin)
Various 1920s-1960s - Austin, Morris, Commer, Dodge etc.
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buzzy bee
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 10:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi

Red ruber grease hoses, and ruber seals around windows to help stop them perishing, vaseline also works for this, but not on the inside of the hose, or they pop off with a bit of pressure! hehe (I found this on a crop sprayer on a 3" pressure hose at 5 bar! hehe Laughing I also happene dto be in the workshop!)

Secondly, ally to ally, use milk of magnesia instead of copper grease!

Cheers

Dave
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Uncle Joe
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 2:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have said this before on another topic, but the best thing for rubber seals is Talcum powder. Doesnt harm your Armani if you get some on it...

UJ
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Rivet_101
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 11, 2007 6:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Uncle Joe wrote:
I have said this before on another topic, but the best thing for rubber seals is Talcum powder. Doesnt harm your Armani if you get some on it...

UJ


hahaha. Like it!
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buzzy bee
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 11, 2007 6:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi

Do you think a victorian gent like me wears armani? hehe Wink Laughing

Cheers

Dave
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