classic car forum header
Classic cars forum & vehicle restoration.
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
How To Register     Posting Photographs     Privacy Policy     F/book facebook.com/oldclassiccar

Is it safe to clean this?
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Classic cars forum & vehicle restoration. Forum Index -> Mechanical Restoration
Author Message
dalbuie



Joined: 24 Dec 2007
Posts: 408
Location: Gullane

PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2008 5:08 pm    Post subject: Is it safe to clean this? Reply with quote

After much thought I decided to strip the engine in situ to allow for cleaning and painting. First time I've stripped anything this size and I'm wondering if it would be safe/sensible to gunk and wash all this before painting the covers and re-assembling.

It all looks pretty basic - thankfully - but I'm not sure if I could cause any damage by cleaning.

Removal of top and side covers...


Removal of sump to show oil squirters. The sump has a 1" layer of black gunge in the bottom which I will clean out, as well as cleaning all the squirters and checking their alignment.



Cheers
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
peter scott



Joined: 18 Dec 2007
Posts: 6177
Location: Edinburgh

PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2008 5:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For the interior it might be better to use parafin rather than Gunk. I don't think it would be nice to fill bearings and passages with wash water.

Peter
_________________
http://www.nostalgiatech.co.uk
1939 SS Jaguar 2 litre saloon
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
dalbuie



Joined: 24 Dec 2007
Posts: 408
Location: Gullane

PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2008 5:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think I have an old pressure spray from the garden that I might be able to fill with paraffin. That and a couple of soft brushes might do.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Rick
Site Admin


Joined: 27 Apr 2005
Posts: 21021
Location: North-west UK

PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2008 6:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A stiff brush and paraffin (or old petrol) would get most of it shifted, anything you can clean away from the engine (eg rocker assembly) means less chance of washing bits of old oil and crud into the inner engine, oil ways etc. Try and block off any oil or water galleries would be a good idea too.

Rick
_________________
Rick (OCC Admin)
Various 1920s-1960s - Austin, Morris, Commer, Dodge etc.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
peter scott



Joined: 18 Dec 2007
Posts: 6177
Location: Edinburgh

PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2008 6:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dalbuie wrote:
That and a couple of soft brushes might do.


Actually you may find stiffish brushes more effective. Old paint brushes where the bristles are well worn down work well.

P.
_________________
http://www.nostalgiatech.co.uk
1939 SS Jaguar 2 litre saloon
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
dalbuie



Joined: 24 Dec 2007
Posts: 408
Location: Gullane

PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2008 8:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cheers. I'll have a go over the weekend, you can always pop past with Ken on Sunday if you want to help Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
buzzy bee



Joined: 23 Nov 2007
Posts: 3397
Location: South Cheshire

PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2008 9:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi

They are some long push rods!

Sorry for my ignorance but what does the cover look like, as the sparking plugs seem to be under the cover?

Cheers

Dave
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
dalbuie



Joined: 24 Dec 2007
Posts: 408
Location: Gullane

PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2008 10:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's the engine before I removed the cover



I take lots of pictures so I can remember how it all goes back together Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
buzzy bee



Joined: 23 Nov 2007
Posts: 3397
Location: South Cheshire

PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2008 10:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi

Cheers, I see how it is now, pics are a good idea, phone cameras saved me at college dismantling tractors on more than one ocassion.

Cheers

Dave
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
peter scott



Joined: 18 Dec 2007
Posts: 6177
Location: Edinburgh

PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2008 11:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dalbuie wrote:
Cheers. I'll have a go over the weekend, you can always pop past with Ken on Sunday if you want to help Smile


On Wednesday we took the sump off Ken's Mark IV too, also with a view to cleaning it out. He's been seeing his oil pressure drop when going round right hand bends. So far we discovered that there was no sump gasket fitted but just some sealent and it looks like some bits of that sealant got into a split it the oil pump strainer. Shocked

Peter
_________________
http://www.nostalgiatech.co.uk
1939 SS Jaguar 2 litre saloon
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Jim Walker



Joined: 01 Oct 2008
Posts: 124
Location: Chesterfield, Derbys.

PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2008 11:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What engine is this? It looks vaguely Triumph, though with that side push-rod (cum everything else) cover I doubt it.
Also, what are you meaning by "squirters". It is a term I have never heard applied to an engine and I can't see anything in the pic' that looks as if it squirts.

Jim.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
buzzy bee



Joined: 23 Nov 2007
Posts: 3397
Location: South Cheshire

PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2008 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi

A Certain Yank Pickup by any chance?

Cheers

Dave
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
peter scott



Joined: 18 Dec 2007
Posts: 6177
Location: Edinburgh

PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2008 11:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jim Walker wrote:

Also, what are you meaning by "squirters".


Jim,

Look at the big end caps. (There's one just visible at the top of the picture.) Maybe dippers or scoops would be the terms we'd use this side of the pond.

Peter
_________________
http://www.nostalgiatech.co.uk
1939 SS Jaguar 2 litre saloon
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
dalbuie



Joined: 24 Dec 2007
Posts: 408
Location: Gullane

PostPosted: Sat Oct 11, 2008 9:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's from a 1941 Chevy pickup with the original 216 low pressure engine. They are probably best called dippers and oil nozzles.

From the stovebolt forum:

There is "full-pressure" lubrication of cam and main bearings, the rocker arm assembly, and the timing gears. The "dipper" system is for rod bearing lubrication is not really a "splash-oil" system (as many people now call it).

Q. Does the "dipper" system actually collect oil as the dippers move through the oil near the bottom of the pan?

Or, do the dippers receive oil that is sprayed into them by an array of tubes that are fed by the oil pump?

A. Yes, both.

If you want to look at the manual it can be found @ http://chevy.oldcarmanualproject.com/shop/1942_47/4247csm620.htm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jim Walker



Joined: 01 Oct 2008
Posts: 124
Location: Chesterfield, Derbys.

PostPosted: Sat Oct 11, 2008 8:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks very much. I saw the oil pump and did not see the 'Dipper'. I have never before seen both on the same engine. I thought dippers had died when oil pumps were introduced.

I presume that when you remove the big-end caps you will find no oilways in the crank to feed oil from the main-bearings. I imagine that oil level is very critical on this engine. A bit archaic, but all bearings need is an adequate supply of oil. Pressurising the oil system is only the means to ensure that supply. An internal phenomenon in a rotating bearing called an "oil wedge" keeps the bearing surfaces apart.

Jim.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Classic cars forum & vehicle restoration. Forum Index -> Mechanical Restoration All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Forum T&C


php BB powered © php BB Grp.