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Water pump
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Greeney in France



Joined: 06 Mar 2008
Posts: 1173
Location: Limousin area of France

PostPosted: Sat Oct 11, 2008 8:55 pm    Post subject: Water pump Reply with quote

In my traction I have this huge cast iron water pump, I have purchased a complete rebuild kit including the main shaft and Bronze bearing.
How do I fit the new one to into the relevant place, I havent done anything to it apart from dismantle the old shaft and bearing and the original bronze sleeve looks well and truly in place. Do I need to heat the casting to remove or replace or will it tap out and in?
Thank you
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buzzy bee



Joined: 23 Nov 2007
Posts: 3397
Location: South Cheshire

PostPosted: Sat Oct 11, 2008 10:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi

I think I need some pics!

Cheers

Dave
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Phil - Nottingham



Joined: 01 Jan 2008
Posts: 1254
Location: Nottingham

PostPosted: Sat Oct 11, 2008 10:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pics would useful but the bearing would be a press fit. Heating the whole lot may not work well on removal but its the best way to fit the new one

ie heat the housing in a hot oven (or boiling water if alloy and/or old casting)

Freeze the bush in a freezer for 24 hours and quicky press togther.

Some mandrels/pressing blocks/tubes may have to be arranged for but its essential both bush and housinf line up exactly straight as if out of line it will stick and damage/crack both if excessive force is used.

If the bearing is sintered bronze it will need soaking in engine oil for 24 hours before freezing
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Greeney in France



Joined: 06 Mar 2008
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Location: Limousin area of France

PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2008 5:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote


How do I know if its sintered bronze, there was nothing on the new packet and nothing in the French manual about repair?
The casting is a 1950s
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47p2



Joined: 24 Nov 2007
Posts: 2002
Location: Glasgow

PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2008 8:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would cut the bearing out with a hacksaw. You don't need to cut right through it, but need to go far enough that the bearing wall will give enough to allow it to move.

You will most likely find the new bush is a press fit in. I can't see it needing a lot of pressure to refit, I would think a reasonable vice should be enough
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Phil - Nottingham



Joined: 01 Jan 2008
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Location: Nottingham

PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2008 11:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would be very careful removing the old bush - cutting out would definitely be the safest way.

Heating/freezing to press the new one in as well - the casting looks fragile!

the bush does not appear to be sintered
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47p2



Joined: 24 Nov 2007
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2008 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Two or possibly three cuts along the length of the bush with a hacksaw and it should almost fall out with very little pressure required. As I say you don't have to go all the way through the bush, stop cutting just before the saw touched the casting
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Greeney in France



Joined: 06 Mar 2008
Posts: 1173
Location: Limousin area of France

PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2008 1:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Before I checked this I put a cut in it and gave it a tap with a correct size socket and managed to knock it out with ease thank you
I haven't attempted the refit yet, the casting isn't fragile at all it is very chunky in this area its probably just the way the photo looks as I cropped it to do an insert
The bronze bush does have a little oil feed tube in the casting, how does the oil get to the shaft though?
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47p2



Joined: 24 Nov 2007
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Location: Glasgow

PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2008 2:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Greeney in France wrote:
The bronze bush does have a little oil feed tube in the casting, how does the oil get to the shaft though?


Does the bronze bush have an oil feed hole?
Does the casting have an oil feed hole?

If the casting does not have a hole, then I would think that the bush is made for several models of which one/several may be oil fed. If this is the case the hole can be ignored

If the casting has a hole (and oil is fed through) but the bush does not then you will need to drill a hole through the bush.

Oil fed bushes usually have both a hole and a couple of grooves. The grooves allow the oil to flow without causing damage to the bush & seals
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Greeney in France



Joined: 06 Mar 2008
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Location: Limousin area of France

PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2008 4:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the picture above (lefthand pic) you can see the top of the bush in the recess and below it is an oil feed hole which used to have a cap on it it is about 30mm long the problem is that is confusing me is that the bush doesnt have a hole or a slot in it so how does the lubricating get through to the shaft, it must work somehow as it is original as far as I can tell and wasn't worn really I just am revising everything. Thats why I was asking about what sintered looks like as maybe its porous enough for the oil to get through.
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Phil - Nottingham



Joined: 01 Jan 2008
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2008 4:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sintered metal is semi porous like very fine sponge. It looks slightly rough. Tyr sosking it in a known amount of oil in a transparent container - the level will drop if it is.

Sintered or not its quite normal to have to drill a hole via the oil feed and just fill the tube up with oil.

It WILL find its way down to lubricate teh shaft by cappilary action and centrifugal force especially when it warms up
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47Jag



Joined: 26 Jun 2008
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Location: Bothwell, Scotland

PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2008 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Greeney,

A technique that that I use to hasten the oil absorbtion is of a sintered bush; Sit the bushing the pad of your thumb (IE less than 1" diameter) fill it to the brim with oil and then squeeze the oil with you other thumb. If it's sintered bushing you should see a 'froth' of bubbles on the outside surface as the oil get force thru' the bush.

Art
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Greeney in France



Joined: 06 Mar 2008
Posts: 1173
Location: Limousin area of France

PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2008 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That sounds like a good idea I will try it tomorrow, I have found in my sort of workshop manual that it is indeed a roulement poreux as the froggies call it. It also says, it is no longer necessary to drill the bronze
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Phil - Nottingham



Joined: 01 Jan 2008
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2008 10:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You learn something every day - I would still test it in case it is not sintered as a hole would be essential
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47p2



Joined: 24 Nov 2007
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2008 10:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It could be that the original bush has been replaced some time ago with the incorrect bush, hence no hole
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