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Homepage. This page: Several old photos, all featuring A40 Devons of the late 1940s, early 1950s.

1. Austin A40 "woodie"

Peter sent me the "woodie" photographs shown here. They show a cracking Austin A40 station wagon that belonged to his parents in the 1950s. Sadly the car ended up being written off after a collision with a lorry, so CMS 277 is no longer around sadly. It looks to be based on a commercial rather than saloon chassis, if the larger 17 inch wheels and front wings with larger openings are anything to go by. Saloons would also have chrome strips on the doors, whereas vans and pickups didn't. Whoever built the coachwork on this A40 chassis did a wonderful job, the swooping line of the roof and the woodwork really looks great. Note the split rear tailgate, perfect for an impromptu picnic or cup of tea.
Austin woodie
A40 woodie

2. A Devon saloon car

Nigel emailed this old photo over, it shows a standard four-door A40 Devon saloon that once belonged to his family. The Austins shown in the first three photos on this page do not have separate front opening quarterlights, whereas my '49 saloon and later pickups all do, typical of the detail alterations that BMC tended to make to their cars during a production run.
Austin A40 saloon
The Devon was a 4dr saloon first introduced in 1947, and was a clean sheet of paper for Austin, who after the war were still producing models largely based on their pre-war offerings. Power was from a new 1200cc engine, that would later become the B series, and feature in BMC/BL cars into the 1980s in enlarged form. There was also a short-lived 2dr version, called the Dorset, which is a very rare motor nowadays. Those wanting to cut more of a dash, could opt for the convertible A40 Sports, which utilised the same basic running gear from the Devon, but with twin carbs fitted to give it a little more ooomphhh.
The Devon would be replaced by the Somerset model in the early 1950s, utilising the Devon's chassis and engine, but clothed with a more bulbous body, very similar in style to the larger A70 Hereford.

3. Austin A40 Devons at Longbridge.

Old Nail, a former contributor to the site forum, sent this picture over, showing a large number of Austin A40 Devons parked up.
Austin A40 Devon
I'm fairly sure this photograph was taken at Longbridge, and it shows lots of A40 Devons as far as the eye can see.

4. Irish-registered A40 Devon.

Next, a photo showing an Irish A40 Devon, looking a little tired and due for a good scrub up! The chrome looks filthy, and the numberplate has received several knocks. Perhaps the owner was a little less than careful with their dumpy little Austin, the angle he or she has parked at wouldn't win too many prizes with the old bill nowadays. The ZE registration letters show that this Austin was registered in the Dublin area. This series had a long run, from Jan 1940 right through to February 1952. Just visible in the background is a later A40 or A50 Cambridge.
Austin Devon in Ireland

5. A Devon and its owner.

This next shot shows a raffish chap, cigarette in hand, leaning against his shiny Austin Devon. The car's registration is KLK 986, a London series used from December 1948 onwards. This Devon has the optional steel sliding sunroof, and also doesn't come equipped with front door quarterlights, as most did. Everything else looks just as BMC intended it, although the front bumper is pointing skywards for some reason, making it tricky to use the starting handle should the need ever arise.
(Please click the thumbnails to view full-size Austin images.)
An Austin A40 Devon saloon car
I've always liked the Devon model, introduced before Austin merged into the BMC empire. I once owned a black A40 saloon.

6. A Swiss A40.

Two British classics are in evidence in this 1950s photograph. A stationary Morris Minor almost rubs bumpers with a coachbuilt Berna truck, while pulling away from the parking area is a Swiss-registered A40 Devon, fitted with a roof rack - a handy fitment as the Devon's boot isn't the largest. The country plate for Switzerland (CH) can just be seen, alongside the A40's number plate. Visible alongside the Minor is the shapely rump of a Graber-bodied sports tourer, based on ???
Swiss-registered Devon

7. Devon racing car (!)

Here I have two old photographs of a race meeting at an unidentified location. Appearing in both is car number 19, an A40 Devon which is lined up to compete in what looks like a club race meeting in the late 1940s. I've joined the two photographs together to best show the "grid", apologies for the horizontal scrolling required but it was the only way to add them in as one image and still leave some of the detail in evidence. The location has the feel of an ex-wartime airfield to it - many post-war races were held at disused runways and perimeter tracks, the two most famous being those that went on to become the Silverstone and Goodwood racing circuits. A double decker bus is parked at the side of the track, with a banner draped upon it identifying the "Start and Finish". Perhaps those people sat in the relative comfort of the upper level were the event's commentators? Behind the bus is another interesting commercial vehicle, in the shape of a CMP (Canadian Military Pattern) truck, with its distinctive - raked forward - screens. An Allard is parked close to it.
The vehicles are quite an eclectic mix of road-going cars. Number 15, alongside the A40, is a Ford V8 Pilot. Behind the Ford are the swooping lines of a 1947-1950 Bristol 400, entry number 30. Parked with the Bristol is car 23, an Austin 8 (similar to the 10 but with a single rear window rather than two). There is also a glimpse of an upright Ford - perhaps an E494A Anglia.
Possibly rarest of the bunch is a Healey Elliott, stopped one place ahead of an L-Type Vauxhall Wyvern. I can't quite make out the Healey's registration, it looks like JRD 7 or similar. The car bringing up the rear could well be a Citroen Traction Avant (Light 15).
Austin Devon racing car

8. 1950 A40 in Canada.

Many A40 Devons found their way to Canada, proving popular thanks to their rugged no-frills design. Greg dropped me a line recently with the following three family photographs he has, each showing the grey Austin Devon, with blue interior, that his parents bought new in 1950 from a local agency in Toronto. His father specified a sliding steel sunroof for their new car - an option not often found on surviving cars, perhaps due to their propensity to leak in water (something that Greg remembers being an issue from day one with their car).
Photograph number one sees a young Greg with the family's pet Brittany Spaniel, Gyp, at a lodge in Northern Ontario. This was either in 1950 or 1951.
New Austin Devon in 1950 or 1951
The second photograph features Greg's mum stood alongside the Austin, possibly on return from a holiday. Note the registration plate, with light-coloured lettering on a dark background. In the final photograph the registration has changed, and now features dark lettering on a paler background.
Grey A40 car in Canada
Greg's mum is shown once again stood with the dependable Austin, this time in 1954.
Front view
Big thanks to Greg for sending these photos over :-)

9. 1949 example.

The latest contributor to the A40 Devon photo page is John Burgoyne, who sent over the following two photographs and was agreeable to them being included on this page. The A40 was owned by John's parents, and they referred to it as the "boneshaker" - I remember mine being a little roly-poly, and under-damped, but not particularly bone-rattling. The car's London-area registration, KXE 703, suggests that it was a 1949 example (as was mine). John is shown here as a young lad, stood with his Aunt. The location is probably Richmond Park. Other than sporting a "GB" plate it looks to be in standard trim.
Rear 3/4 view of the 1949 Devon
The second of John's photos is a side view of the same car, with his father stood on the left. The location is Brighton, on a day out to the seaside. My thanks to John for sharing his photos, great to see them thanks :-)
Side view
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