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Homepage. This page: An interesting old snapshot of Stirling Moss at a racing circuit, with an Austin-Healey sportscar.

Austin-Healey 100/6.

This photo of an Austin-Healey appears to have been taken prior to a drivers' parade at the British Grand Prix. The presence of white fencing, visible behind the Maserati pit area, suggest to me a horse-racing venue. The Aintree racing circuit is my guess, a track that hosted the British Grand Prix on five occasions between 1955 and 1962. Although visually very similar to the Mk1 Austin-Healey 3000, I think that the car shown below is in fact the 100/6 model (the 3000 came with wire wheels as standard, whereas this car is on steel rims).
(Please click the thumbnail to view full-size image.)
Moss with an Austin-Healey sports car

Stirling Moss.

Sir Stirling Moss, as he would become, needs little introduction. On the 16th July 1955 he competed in the British GP at Aintree for the works Mercedes-Benz team, alongside Fangio, Kling and Taruffi in the W196. He achieved his first ever Grand Prix victory at this meeting, the first victory for a British driver at their home race. Moss' return to the circuit in July 1957 saw him and team-mate Tony Brookes behind the wheel of the British Vanwall, again taking the chequered flag, the first time a British driver, in a British car, had won the British round of the F1 Championship. In 1959 he'd compete in another British car, the BRM P25, finishing second in that race. In 1961, driving a Lotus, he'd drive a Grand Prix at Aintree for the final time.

The Austin-Healey 100/6.

Driver parades prior to a Grand Prix are nothing new, as this photo demonstrates. A line-up of brand new, as yet un-registered, Austin-Healeys must have been provided for this race, and Moss can be seen perched on the back of one. I've a vague recollection of seeing a video containing a fleet of white Healeys used for a pre-race parade at Aintree, but I can't put my hands on it. The Healey has "18" on the door. Was this Moss' car number in the race, or his start position on the grid? or neither!!?
The four cylinder Austin-Healey 100 was introduced in 1953, as a collaboration between BMC (Austin) and Donald Healey. The six cylinder 100/6 was introduced in 1956, and had a slightly longer wheelbase, a revised grille featuring horizontal wavy bars, and a bonnet scoop on the bonnet. In 1959 the Austin-Healey 3000 would be introduced, the Mk1 looking very similar to the 100/6. The Mk2 and Mk3 3000 can easily be distinguised from the earlier cars by the use of a grille with vertical, rather than horizontal, bars. A red A-H 3000 MkIII can be seen on the cover of AUSTIN magazine from 1964.
Return to Page 11 of the vintage motoring gallery.
Elsewhere within the gallery of original photographs there is a great shot of Jack Brabham and his Cooper Bristol Redex Special racing car.

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