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Stopping moisture affecting the clutch.
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Journer



Joined: 28 May 2012
Posts: 115
Location: Glasgow

PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 2015 12:11 pm    Post subject: Stopping moisture affecting the clutch. Reply with quote

I'm sure most are familiar with the annoyance with the clutch sticking to the flywheel and having to rock the car and start in gear or up on stands to free it. Is there any way to stop moisture getting to it? I noticed that there is an aperture on the bell housing where the slave enters it. I guess there must have been a be a rubber gromit/plug or such like to close the hole.

Is there any point in trying to close this but still allowing movement of the slave? Or is this a an exercise in futility?
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peterwpg



Joined: 10 Apr 2008
Posts: 2223
Location: New Brunswick. Canada

PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 2015 1:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Stopping moisture affecting the clutch. Reply with quote

Journer wrote:
I'm sure most are familiar with the annoyance with the clutch sticking to the flywheel and having to rock the car and start in gear or up on stands to free it. Is there any way to stop moisture getting to it? I noticed that there is an aperture on the bell housing where the slave enters it. I guess there must have been a be a rubber gromit/plug or such like to close the hole.

Is there any point in trying to close this but still allowing movement of the slave? Or is this a an exercise in futility?


I have never heard of a clutch sticking due to moisture, unless it has been stood for a very very long time.
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Peter L
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peter scott



Joined: 18 Dec 2007
Posts: 5981
Location: Edinburgh

PostPosted: Wed Jul 01, 2015 7:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think the best plan is just to start the engine periodically, put it in gear and slip the clutch with the handbrake on. Over the winter I do this once a month although that frequency could probably be doubled for a better guarantee.

I think you are right that moisture is the problem. If my car is in regular use I have no problem but it definitely does not fully disengage after a few weeks doing nothing and takes a few gear changes to rub away the corrosion.

My garage is ventilated and has a DPM but that's clearly not enough.

Peter
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ka



Joined: 03 Dec 2007
Posts: 600
Location: Orkney.

PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2015 7:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The gromit will make little difference, the problem is the temperature variation between the metals of the engine, and outside air, plus the moisture content in the air. The moisture will also form on the inside of the engine, so a dehumidifier is the easy answer over periods of temperature fluctuation. Which for the UK, is every day.
Starting and running to temperature will remove the condensation, but create additional in the engine as it cools, but at least the clutch will be free.
The only answer is to use the vehicle regularly, or keep the engine warm enough to deter the formation of condensation.
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MikeG



Joined: 16 Sep 2013
Posts: 56
Location: Cheshire/Staffordshire Border

PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2015 8:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What if you put a Brick on the clutch pedal, to keep the clutch dissengaged?
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MikeG



Joined: 16 Sep 2013
Posts: 56
Location: Cheshire/Staffordshire Border

PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2015 8:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What if you put a Brick on the clutch pedal, to keep the clutch dissengaged?
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peter scott



Joined: 18 Dec 2007
Posts: 5981
Location: Edinburgh

PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2015 8:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That is an interesting idea. It should lessen the penetration of the rust into the centre plate but perhaps the prolonged compression of the springs will shorten their life.

As an aside: Having about a year ago rebuilt the engine of an MG SA that has an oil bath clutch I had thought that it would not suffer from this but it does and it is apparently a common problem with all SAs. http://www.nostalgiatech.co.uk/new_page_30.htm

Peter
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Last edited by peter scott on Thu Nov 22, 2018 11:31 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Bitumen Boy



Joined: 26 Jan 2012
Posts: 1320
Location: Above the snow line in old Monmouthshire

PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2015 10:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How about a garage dehumidifier? That'll keep the damp at bay. If that's not practical then how about some sort of moisture absorbent plug in that bellhousing aperture? They used to be available to fit sparkplug holes etc. of stored engines, and if still around may be adaptable to suit this application.
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D4B



Joined: 28 Dec 2010
Posts: 2068
Location: Hampshire UK

PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2015 10:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The series Landrover has a hole in the bottom of the bell housing to allow
moisture (and oil !!) drip out, and a bracket which holds a blanking plug to be screwed in when "wading"



They thought of almost everything, shame they didn't design a better crank rear oil seal Wink

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Journer



Joined: 28 May 2012
Posts: 115
Location: Glasgow

PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2015 11:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

i was thinking about the brick jamming the clutch but I think the constant pressure on the clutch would be detrimental to the seals in time. I will just have to use it more. Thanks for the replies. Very Happy
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peterwpg



Joined: 10 Apr 2008
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Location: New Brunswick. Canada

PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2015 12:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Didn't the bell housing on Ford 105E's have a hole with a split pin through, to let water/oil out ?
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