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Homepage. This page: Original photos showing examples of the Morris Eight Series E with their owners.

1. Morris Eight Series E.

Shown below, a Morris 8 Series 'E' photographed in a driveway, probably in the 1950s. The Series E first left the Cowley factory in 1938, although the activities of a German individual the following year nobbled plans for long-term production. Once WW2 was out of the way, production of the Series E Morris resumed, only to end in 1948 with the introduction of the brand new Minor (powered in the early days by the Series E's sidevalve engine). The Series E continued a successful line of 8hp Morris cars that sold well throughout the 1930s, offering affordable motoring to the family man (and woman). As with the earlier "8" cars, a Series E tourer would also be offered, but only in the months leading up to WW2. After the war, only saloons (and the Z van) would be offered in the UK.
Morris 8

2. A Morris 8 Series E on a family picnic.

Photo number 2 shows a different Series E Morris, parked at the roadside while the family enjoy a picnic. Note the correct sloping headlamps - many cars were converted to conventional 7" Lucas headlamps, but this one remains as Morris intended.
(Please click the thumbnail to view full-size image.)
Another Morris 8 Series E

3. A gent stood with his trusty Morris.

Now the turn of Morris 8 Series E registration ENV 827 to feature on this page, parked with its owner stood alongside. The ENV registration (Northamptonshire) only came into use in May 1948. As the model was phased out later that year, the approximate date of this car can be guessed at quite accurately. The car's paintwork bears a few scars, and the two visible door handles have both developed a slight droop, so it had probably seen a few years' use by the time of this snapshot.
A 1948 Series E

4. A post-war two-door Series E in suburbia.

A little less door handle droop evident with this next Series E, a post-war two-door car registered towards the end of 1946 in Surrey. A lady can (just) be seen sat behind the car's steering wheel, while a small dog hovers at the rear corner - perhaps eyeing up the tyre for target practice...
The Morris' paintwork is in immaculate condition, with just the numberplate bearing evidence of some mileage. The bottom of the radiator grille may be a little out of shape too. So far, all the period photos of Series E Morris 8s on this page feature cars with the original sloping headlamps, rather than the aftermarket conversions which would become quite popular.
The setting is very much in suburbia, tidy semi-detached houses can be seen in the background. A young child is in the nearest garden, playing on a swing and sneaking a peak at the Morris parked outside.
A 1946 Morris Eight Series E

5. Front view of a classic Morris.

The next photograph to feature a Series E Morris was emailed over by David Aston. It shows his mother, Kay, with her first car, and it was in buying this car at Aston's in Coventry that she met David's father. Her family's background was also in the motor trade, her father was General Manager at the Daimler motor company and he also had his own garage in Brentwood until 1939. Thanks for sending the photo over. The car is a two-door example of the popular 8hp Morris. Note the extra lamps fitted to this example. In the background is a lorry owned by M. Millmore Ltd, "Island Carriers", of Ventnor, Isle of Wight.
Two-door Morris, front view

6. A parked two-door saloon.

Not a SUV, MPV, 4x4 or other modern contrivance in shot. Instead, three classic British saloon cars of either the late 1930s, or immediate post-war era. Nearest the camera is a "Flying" Standard, circa 1938, maybe a 14hp or 16hp model. Further up, finished in a light metallic colour, is a Talbot - or Sunbeam Talbot - while sandwiched in the middle is a black Morris Series E. Note the lack of road markings, and the old formerly gas, but now electric, street light.
Parked Morris Series E
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