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Homepage. This page: Various classic stock cars of the 1960s, including Fiat and Ford-based cars.

Classic stock cars.

In a way, looking at these old photos is a depressing activity, as a number of now-collectable cars have met their end during the build of these weekend race-cars. However, not everything can be saved, and at the time of these shots - say mid-1960s - the car bodyshells grafted onto these stock car's frames were little more than old junk to most people, rusted, battered, and one step from the crusher. Few people nowadays would bat an eyelid at a few old Ford Mondeos, or Fiat Cromas, being chopped up to make a banger or stock car racer, likewise in the '60s no-one much cared for an old 300E Ford, a sit-up-and-beg Pop, or even a rare Topolino being sacrificed in the name of speed. Chop up a sound '50s car today though, during the build of a historic stock car, and it wouldn't go down too well in some quarters I'm sure.
Some of the bodies fitted to the chassis shown below are identifiable, and others I've not been able to pin down. If anyone recognises these cars, or perhaps the drivers who battled in these stock car racers, please drop me a line. Maybe one of the venues featured here rings a bell with someone?

Historic stock car photos.

The first photo has been shown in full size, the remainder are clickable thumbnails. Car 54, shown below, is typical of the breed - a basic home-made chassis, into which a large engine has been installed. The bodyshell is a much-modified road car shell, adapted - rather agriculturally - for its new role. The eagle-eyed will recognise the body as that of a Ford Thames 300E van, or possibly the Escort estate version, of the mid-1950s.
A historic stock car based on a Ford

2. Car 36 - Willie Harrison.

I've not been able to identify the donor bodyshell in this car, car number 36 driven by Willie Harrison. The open exhaust stubs on this car suggest a V8 lurks under that bonnet. Note the much-modified old coach to the left, converted into a stock-car transporter.
(Please click the thumbnail to view full-size image.)
Stock car #36

3. A different Car 36.

I'm assuming this Car 36 was at a different meeting, or else at the same meeting but in a different class? The shape of this car's tail-end looked familiar, and then it clicked - Fiat 600. A note on the rear says: "Yes! Rodney Falding's car has been driven on the public highway." Does anyone remember this historic stock car? The top of the engine says "[something] Rocket" on it, if that helps? A variety of classics are visible parked in the distance - Morris Minor, A40, Mk2 Consul and VW splitscreen to name just a few.
A different car #36

4. Car 69 - Ford Pop stock car.

Now to a very muddy car park, and Car 69. The bodyshell's origins are obviously Ford Pop or Anglia, and the front wheels look suspiciously like those from a V8 Ford, probably a Pilot. Road-cars in shot include an Austin 1800, an Oxford/Cambridge estate (with spare tyres on the roof rack), and a selection of old lorries acting as transporters.
Ford 103E Pop stock car

5. Car 60 - Fiat Topolino.

Even in the 1960s, these early Fiat Topolinos must have been quite rare, so its a shame to see a Topolino's body hacked about to cloth this stock car's chassis.
Fiat Topolino stock car

6. Car 41.

Again I can't make out this car's bodily origins, and it could indeed be a one-off built for the job. The Oxford/Cambridge is again visible in the background, as are some more classic lorries.
Another historic stock car
As more information on these classic stock cars comes to light, I'll update this page again. Equally, if you have any old photos like this which could be added in here, please get in touch.
A well known driver of stock cars in the 1950's, Gerry Scalli, formed a daredevil stunt-car display team known as the Hollywood Motor Rodeo. Some rare photographs of his cars now feature on this page of the site.
Return to Page 11 in the vintage car motoring gallery.

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