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Homepage. This page: A head-on view of a Mark 1 Triumph 2000, parked alongside another British classic of the 1960's.

Mk1 Triumph 2000.

As I was growing up, it seemed like Triumph 2000s were everywhere - especially whenever we holidayed in Wales for some reason, but now they are rarely seen, except for at classic car shows. Powered by a smooth (ex-Standard Vanguard) six cylinder engine from the outset in 1963, they were a popular choice for anyone looking for a well-built, comfortable cruiser, available as a saloon or - from 1965 - a cavernous estate car.
(Please click the thumbnail to view full-size image.)
A classic Triumph 2000 Mk1 car
FCH 660C was a 1965-registered Triumph 2000, and was driven, initally at least, on the roads of Derby. Whether this photo was taken in that area or not I'm not sure - the only possible clue is a building in the background with "The Barbecue" emblazoned upon it. Maybe someone remembers this establishment?
Parked alongside the Triumph is another British classic of the 1960's, a Farina-designed Wolseley, probably a 6/110 if the width of the rear track is anything to go by (the previous 6/99 had a slightly narrower track, and larger fins).
The Triumph had been fitted with a number of popular accessories - note the roof rack for instance, and also the presence of a roof-mounted car aerial, suggesting some "in car entertainment" had been installed. A single spotlamp is peeking out from beneath the front bumper - perhaps the other one had fallen off? Just visible, on the other side of the road, is the trades-man's favourite - a Ford 400E panel van.
The Mk1 Triumph 2000 made its debut in 1963, replacing the Phase 3 Vanguard in Standard-Triumph showrooms. The straight six engine was similar to that found under the bonnet of later 2.0 GT6s and Vitesses. A four speed manual gearbox was standard fitment, with overdrive, and a Borg Warner auto, being options if you so desired. In 1968, a fuel-injected 2.5 litre version was introduced to the top of the range, known as the 2.5 PI. The basic style of the Mk1 continued until 1969, when the revised Mk2 Triumph 2000, featuring a raft of styling updates courtesy of Michelotti, was launched.
Although never exactly sprightly, the 2000 was endowed with a reasonable turn of speed. However, if blatting up the new M1 motorway on a regular basis was on the cards, or perhaps a spot of competition use was envisaged, then tuning products from companies such as SAH Triumphtune may have been worth a look.
Return to Page 11 of the classic car motoring gallery.
Other items of interest relating to classic Triumphs include a look at the Standard-Triumph Review magazine, a publication produced by the factory aimed at customers, and potential customers, in the 1960s.

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