header image
Parts
Homepage. This page: Three photos of a vintage motorcyle with its owners, in the 1920s.

1920s Triumph motorcycle.

Thanks to Phil, who emailed these shots over in 2012, I'm able to share the following three photographs. As far as I can tell, the motorcycle is an example of the Triumph Model P, a sidevalve 494cc machine introduced in 1925, costing 42:16:6 in old money - the cheapest "500" in its day. The registration of this 'bike is YM 7492, a London series that had a short run, from November 1925 to March 1926. This would suggest that the motorcycle shown below was registered early in 1926. It proved to be popular with motorcyclists from the outset, and soon over 1,000 machines per week were rolling out of the factory.
This particular machine belonged to Phil's Uncle Harry, and is photographed outside the family's Wealdstone home c1926 (the girl in the photo was born in 1923). It certainly looks to be in excellent condition, pointing to it being relatively new at the time of the shot. What a cracking picture, it's interesting to compare the Triumph in this image to later shots of the same 'bike. This model came equipped with a three-speed gearbox, the hand-lever for which is hidden, on the other side of the flat-sided fuel tank. A toolbox and rear carrier also came as standard.
(Please click the thumbnail to view the full-size images.)
Side view of the motorcycle
The motorcycle is down off its stand now, and its proud owner is photographed astride his machine. The 'bike still looks to be in good order, but I'm not sure that this was taken on the same day as photo no.1. The item shown on the luggage rack (perhaps a tool roll?) has moved, while the circular object fitted to the end of the nearside handgrip in the first photograph isn't in evidence here.
The Triumph and its owner
The last of Phil's photographs appears to have been taken some time later. The paint no longer glistens and I wonder if the chrome rims have been painted over? The bulb horn has been re-positioned, and the headlamp changed - most likely updating from a Lucas acetylene type, to a more modern battery-powered equivalent. The hand-painted lettering on the front number plate also appears to have been modified slightly, thickening some of the strokes to make it more readable, while the tax disc holder has moved also.
Of great interest is the sidecar. Reminiscent of an airship, it looks to be a Watsonian - compare it to the fourth image on the motorcycle sidecars page to see for yourself.
Motorcycle and sidecar
Thanks for sending the photos over!
Visit page 17 in the vintage gallery, or return to the main index.

Custom Search
www.oldclassiccar.co.uk (C) R. Jones. Content not to be reproduced elsewhere.
Website by ableweb.
Privacy Policy, Cookies & Disclaimers