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Head nuts
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Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 266

PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2018 9:51 am    Post subject: Head nuts Reply with quote

What would be a suitable torque setting for the cylinder head nuts on a vintage 4 cylinder side valve engine with everything in good condition, new studs/nuts and flat faces?
Nuts/studs are M12 x1.5 .
Thanks
Mike
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Kleftiwallah



Joined: 27 Oct 2016
Posts: 222
Location: North Wiltshire

PostPosted: Sat Aug 11, 2018 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is absolutely no use to at all but...

A very old instructor (he started his career on steam wagons! Answered a similar question put forward by myself on torque loading in general.

He said " Tighten it until it shears then back it off a flat"!

I should just 'feel for it' and than re-tighten later on after a few miles but how did you get metric nuts on a vintage engine?

Cheers, Tony.

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Keith D



Joined: 16 Oct 2008
Posts: 950
Location: Upper Swan, Western Australia

PostPosted: Sat Aug 11, 2018 3:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Morris Cowleys and Oxfords (vintage years bullnose and flatnose models) used Hotchkiss engines from the French company. When William Morris bought them out in about 1919, he made his bolts with the metric threads but made them using imperial hex rod.

Keith
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Kleftiwallah



Joined: 27 Oct 2016
Posts: 222
Location: North Wiltshire

PostPosted: Sun Aug 12, 2018 11:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Many thanks for the technical info' Keith D.



Smile Cheers, Tony.
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Kleftiwallah



Joined: 27 Oct 2016
Posts: 222
Location: North Wiltshire

PostPosted: Sun Aug 12, 2018 2:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good afternoon Miken,

I may be able to help. I've just been searching through the 'bumf' in the shed for some information not related and came across a booklet entitled "Nut tightening torque data" by Britool for Automobiles, Engines, Tracxtors and Sparking plugs.

Ifg you could tell me what vintage engine it is, I'll see if it's covered.

Cheers, Tony.
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Miken



Joined: 24 Dec 2012
Posts: 266

PostPosted: Wed Aug 15, 2018 5:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

All sorted now. The bullnose Morris club who supply the gaskets , nuts and studs recommend 65 ft/lb.
Thanks, Mike
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Kleftiwallah



Joined: 27 Oct 2016
Posts: 222
Location: North Wiltshire

PostPosted: Wed Aug 15, 2018 10:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice to hear you have sussed it.

Cheers, Tony. Very Happy
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roverdriver



Joined: 18 Oct 2008
Posts: 1146
Location: 100 miles from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2018 7:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the days before the universal ownership of torsion wrenches, it was generally assumed that the standard spanner was design to give the correct tension on a nut if just reasonable pressure was applied. I know that means that a strong person would apply more than an average person, but the spanner itself was the key. Small diameter bolts has small nuts and a small, short length spanner. As the bolt/nut size increases, so to does the length of the shaft of the spanner. This is no accident, it was carefully designed that way. The longer the shaft, the greater the pressure that can be applied at the nut. Often car tool kits had a specially designed spanner for those nuts that needed extra torque, so the kit had a special spanner for the job. Model T and A Fords had a special head stud spanner, and I believe other makes in the same period also worked the same way.
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