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Clutch Slave Cylinder - replacement or repair?
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Invicta
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2007 9:10 pm    Post subject: Clutch Slave Cylinder - replacement or repair? Reply with quote

Yesterday I felt the resistance go when I used the clutch on my Mitsubishi J26 "Jeep".
When I looked at it today the problem is in the slave cylinder which squirts out a small stream of fluid from behind the rubber gaiter at the rear of the cylinder when I depress the clutch pedal.

I assume the cause will be a worn O ring. (I haven't taken it apart yet).

To get an idea of the size - the bolts are 45mm across centers

Has anyone any tips or suggestions.
e.g. Does this look like a cylinder from a more recent range?
Kind regards
Bernard
http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb77/Invicta_photo/SlaveCylinder.jpg


Last edited by Invicta on Mon Jul 16, 2007 4:58 pm; edited 1 time in total
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UKdave2002
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2007 8:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Bernard
this car is keeping you busy!!

You will probably find itís a combination of rust in the boreís (hydraulic fluid absorbs water over time, whilst folks change brake fluids regularly they hardly every change clutch fluid, so it get a high water content) and worn seals.

Quite often how you go about it depends on what you can get! Fortunately clutch slave cylinders were not subject to lots of development, so often carried over from one model to the next.

I have just bought a brand new clutch slave cylinder for an MGA for £16 ! at this cost replacing the seals in the old one just isnít worth it. So if you can get a whole cylinder at the right price do it. If you canít but can get a repair kit you are almost certainly going to have to hone the cylinder to remove rust , which you can either do with a small honing tool on the end of an electric drill, or with some wet and dry on the end of your finger or bit of dowel.

The key thing is to polish out the rough parts of the cylinder. You may end up with some minor ovaling of the cylinder, but the seals should be flexible enough to accommodate this. Purists will tut at this point!, but its not as critical as brake cylinders;
a) because its not so much a safety issue and b) the clutch hydraulics donít have to maintain the pressure for as long as braking systems.

You can check its all ok by depressing the clutch pedal, holding it down for a couple of minís and then checking the clutch is still disengaged.


Dave
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1nvicta
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2007 1:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dave,
It's like going back to when I owned a BSA A10.
At one stage more of the bike was on my mums kitchen table than in my dads garage Very Happy

£16 for a cylinder sounds good to me - nice find.
I will have an ask on some of the classic Jeep sites and see what I can do.
Plan B = (Hopefully) Mitsubishi used the same part on the early Shogun.
Thanks for the tips

I've just found these people on the web
http://www.powertrackbrakes.co.uk/contact.html

Update
I went for re-sleeving. Done by Past Parts in Bury St Edmonds.
Bernard
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