header image
Parts
Homepage. This page: A product designed to keep one's screen clear of rainwater while driving along.

The Rain-A-Way windscreen pad.

In the late-teens and early 1920s, windscreen wipers weren't always that efficient at keeping the screen clear of water. Nowadays motorists can choose from a number of products to keep the rain from their car's windscreen, in addition to the efficient wiper systems that are fitted as standard, but 90-100 years ago this wasn't the case. Modern-day windscreen treatments can trace their origins back to items such as the Rain-A-Way featured here, as advertised in 1918 to the growing number of motorists who were taking to the roads in large numbers in the US of A.
The chap in the advert doesn't appear to have any form of wiper arrangement clearing his windshield, so the Rain-A-Way would - assuming it worked - be a real boon, just as Rain-X is to many drivers today.
The Rain-a-way windshield pad
"Don't drive blindly" the reader is urged, the pad is both a "real convenience and worry saver"....
"Just rub the windshield with this pad - takes only a few seconds - and the rain drops can't cling or mist gather to dim your view of the road. The pad is impregnated with a secret chemical solution. Not greasy. Non-evaporating. Lasts for months."
"No craning your neck outside the car to keep your eye on the road. No wipe, wipe, wipe with windshield wiper or cloth. Send for a Rain-A-Way pad today."
For this miracle product The Badger Manufacturing Corporation of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, required a payment of 25 cents. Just the job for anyone with, say, a vintage Oakland, or perhaps a dashing Stutz for instance. If 25 cents sounded like too big an investment to make, there was always the option of rubbing a cut potato across the inside of the screen, to help with misting up if not the rain on the outside surface.
Garages could order in bulk and re-sell them on from display units that held a dozen pads, after all, they "sell like hot cakes" we're told.
Product to keep the windscreen clear
Read about other long-forgotten goodies such as this in the gadgets and accessories corner of the site.

Old Classic Car homepage

Custom Search
www.oldclassiccar.co.uk (C) R. Jones. Content not to be reproduced elsewhere.
Website by ableweb.
Privacy Policy, Cookies & Disclaimers